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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎234] (377/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Periodical
Maritime
Truces,
1836-42.
234
which they are detached—the continued suppression of piracy, and the protection of
Brit ish commerce.
Government is further of opinion that, keeping the vessels of war in the Gulf
constantly moving in a circle, each vessel in its turn should be directed to proceed to
Bombay for the purpose of refit and the promotion of discipline.
As a general rule, therefore, the Governor in Council has resolved that a vessel
detached from the Gulf, shall not continue on service there for a longer period than
twelve months, andthatonthe expiration of this period, whether relieved ornot, she
sha 11 return t o Bombay, unless under the pressure of some great and overriding emer
gency of such a nature a? will justify the Kesident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. detaining
her on his own responsibility, but with the understanding that the discretion is not
to be lightly exercised, and shall under all circumstances be immediately reported to
Government.
Maintenance and growth of maritime security; 1836-61.
Maritime security had been definitely established in the Persian
Gulf at the close of the last period, but it had still to be watched oyer
and perfected during the period now under consideration.
The system of Maritime Truces, happily introduced in 1835, con
tinued to develop. These Truces, under which every kind of violence at
sea by the Shaikhs of Trucial "'Oman and their subjects was prohibited
and penalised, were at first arranged to cover the pearl fishing season
only and were a matter of annual arrangement; later they were made for
twelve months at a time and were practically continuous; and finally, in
1843, a Truce for ten years was concluded among the usual signatories.
In 1836 successful punitive and deterrent action was taken by an
Indian Naval Squadron at Dohah, Wakrah, and ^Odaid against Bani
Yas pirates and their harbourers ; and in 1841 a few shots tired into
Dohah by another similar squadron brought about the surrender of a
piratical vessel, which was immediately destroyed. In 1846 an expedition
to Jiunah Island resulted in the capture of another vessel which had been
employed for piracy. These were the principal occasions on which forcible
action was required ; and not.only were such offences against good order
at sea as now occurred confined within Arab circles, but the shaikhs of the
Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. began to show a true appreciation of their responsibilities
and to co-operate with the British Government in bringing offenders to
justice.
The matter of wrecks was one in which progress was slower. The
settlement of some claims that arose from the plundering of a vessel
stranded at Han]am in 1838 occupied three years; and it was only com
pleted in the end by means of seizures of Qishm vessels in Indian ports.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎234] (377/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000b2> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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