Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎270] (413/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

270
Interest on the part of France was manifested only in an attempt to
obtain from the Shah a large concession for irrigation works and industrial
enterprise in 'Arabistan. This movement, which was associated with the
name of Dr. Tholozan, physician to the Shah, was defeated by a British
claim of prior right to compensation under the abrogated "Renter
Concession."
British naval arrangements in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 1872-76.
In 1874 it was arranged by the British naval authorities, with a
view to the vessels ot the Royal Navy detailed for service being kept in an
efficient state by constant relief and change, that as a rule current duties
should be carried on by two of the three special ships, the third being
always'absent on a trip to Indian waters. Each vessel was, if possible, to
be allowed ten days or a fortnight in port .at Karachi or Bombay every four
months; on her return to the Gulf she was, as a rule, to call at Gwadur or
Chahbar for the purpose of reporting her arrival and receiving orders as to
her destination. The Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. was to be kept informed of the
movements of ships ; and it was added in the naval instructions : " The
" requisitions made by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. and Agents of course must be
" most carefully attended to, but should they materially interfere with the
u system of relief, Commanding Officers should point out to these officers
" what appears to them the best means for meeting both requirements,
" informing them that these orders have been given with the view of
" affording an efficient squadron, and requesting their co -operation in
" attaining this object/'
Later in the same year, in connection with the threatened descent by
Arab tribes of the mainland upon Bahrain, the Resident in the Persian
Gulf telegraphed to the Senior Naval Officer that the presence of a vessel
of war was urgently required. Ten days passed before the vessel detailed
for service left Karachi, and three weeks before she arrived on the spot;
and meanwhile the crisis had to be met, as best possible, by stationing the
Bombay Marine The navy of the East India Company. vessels " Hugh Rose ^ and "May Frere" off Bahrain.
The Resident consequently requested that the cases might be defined m
which relief routine should be considered to over-ride requisition? by the
political authorities, and it was ruled by the Government of India that the
Resident himself must decide in every instance whether the system of
relief must give way to political exigencies ; but he was required to report

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎270] (413/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00000e> [accessed 23 February 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00000e">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;270] (413/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00000e">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0413.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image