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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎331] (474/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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(2m
331
the coast and suffered severely from the heat ; they left Kirman about
the l^th of June and made via Bampur, Qasrkand and Dashtyari for
Chahbar/where two of them, Captain Rittich and M. Palmgren, arrived
on the 27 th of June ; preceded on the 26th by the corpse of their com
panion, M. Iliin, who had succumbed to the heat j M. Palmgren, a Swede
by race and an elderly man, was much exhausted. The two unfortu
nate explorers were succoured by the British Telegraph officials at Chahbar
and eventually reached Masqat in safety in a native boat.
The expedition which carried out this extensive reconnaissance was
described by the Russian Consular officials in Persia as a " geographical
mission,'' but the head of it, M. Sakhanski, was referred to in the Russian
press as " Director of Persian Railways." Some doubt prevailed at the
time as to the nature of the Russian Government's connection with
the undertaking, but it was in part removed by later information which
came into the possession of His Majesty's Government in 1903. The ex
pedition was then proved to have been £t Railway Commission, charged
with ascertaining the best route for a Russian railway from Transcaucasia
across Persia to the sea ; and it was found that the leader of the Chahbar
party had been Captain P. A. Rittich of the Russian General Staff, the
author of a pamphlet on " Railways in Persia " which had made some
stir in Russia in the early part of 1900, when the Russian press was full
of Persian railway projects and was apprehensive lest the access of Russia
to the sea should be barred by a junction between a German railway to
Baghdad and the Indian railway system. It seemed that the Commission
---or at least Captain Rittich—had condemned the Bushehr and Bandar
'Abbas routes as ending in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , where the power of Britain
was for naval reasons supreme, and at places which were incapable of con
version into ports, and that Captain Rittich had recommended the con
struction of a railway by way of Rasht, Qazvin, Tehran, Qum, Kashan,
Yazd, Kirman, Bam and Bampur to Chahbar Bay at an estimated cost of
£19,696,000 of which £1 ,575,000 was for the construction and armament
of a port at Chahbar. The fact that the railway could not be supported
by local, and must depend upon intercontinental, traffic had been clearly
realised ; and it had been proposed that special customs duties should be
applied in Persia—presumably after the establishment of exclusive influ
ence there by Russia— to prevent the railway from becoming subservient
to British commercial interests.
Chiefly no doubt with a view to the creation of solid interests in the The Russian
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , but partly perhaps with the object of providing colourable gation and
grounds for political interference there, resort was next had by Russia to ^
subsidised commercial enterprises. The first hint that Russian commercial other Ruasian

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎331] (474/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00004b> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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