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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎349] (492/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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349
that the circumstance might be turned to account to moderate their interfer
ence in Persian politics, to render them less hostile to Christians and Euro
peans as suchj and even to draw them into a sort of alliance with the British
Government for defeating Russian designs in Persia. Steps were taken
in 1903 in the direction suggested, but they were ineffectual, the Mujtahids
showing no inclination to enter into cordial dealings with the British politi
cal representatives ; and in the following yeai advantage seems to have been
taken by the Persian Government of the British negotiations with some of
the Mujtahids to prejudice the Porte against them as persons holding rela
tions with a European power : hence the action, already mentioned, of the
Turkish Government.
Manifestations of hostility to British policy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. were from Arabic and
time to time remarked in the press of more than one Muhammadan country, ^ f>r '" a11 P ie ss.
and some of them were genuine, being inspired by genuine religious or
racial feeling; but such were difficult to distinguish from the emanations
of the pseudo-Islamic bureau maintained in the French Foreign Office. This
difficulty was felt especially in regard to an Arabic anti-British leaflet,
posted at Cairo, which reached Bombay on the 12th of December 1903 ;
copies were found addressed to Masqat, Dibai, Kuwait, Basrah, Muham-
mareh, Bushehr and Lingeh ; and its interception by the Indian Post Office
was authorised. The tract purported to be the wortof one 'Abdul Muham-
mad-bin-'Abdullah ; it related to a tour by Lord Curzon as Viceroy of
India in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and its object was to dissuade the inhabitants
of the Gulf from attaching importance to the demonstration, and from
putting faith in the British Government.
The (< Liwa," Muaiyid," and other newspapers published in Egypt
set themselves in 1904-05 to disseminate mendacious accounts of British
action in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and North-Eastern Arabia, and the effects,
as they had some influence, were unfortunate. These papers were believed
to be largely responsible for a strongly Anglophobe attitude exhibited by
most of the Turkish officials in the Basrah Wilayat in 1905 ; and, on the
other hand, it was suspected that the Egyptian journals were themselves
directly inspired from Constantinople.
Belonging to a somewhat different class was the " Habl-ul-Matin/'' a
Persian newspaper published at Calcutta, which frequently took advantage
of the freedom of the press in British India to disparage the Government
whose protection it enjoyed. In this print there appeared a false and anti-
British account of a crisis in Bahrain in. 1904 which made it necessary to
arrange for a dementi by a respectable newspaper at Tehran. The " Habl-
ul-Matin " offended upon other occasions also, but its attacks had not the
importance attaching to those of the Cairo press.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎349] (492/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00005d> [accessed 21 August 2018]

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