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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎467] (610/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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467
3or
imtki
in 1854, he placed his son Klialid, whom he left in charge there, under
the virtual guardianship of Colonel Hamerton, the British Kesident. A
great part of 'Oman was explored in 1835-36 by Lieutenants Wellsted
and Whitelock of the Indian Navy, under the auspices of Saiyid
Sa'id.
The friendly and reasonable disposition of Sa'id was turned to account
by the British Government in the conclusion with him of various treaties,
of which the most important were a Treaty of Commerce in 1839 and two
Treaties for the suppression of the Slave Trade in 1822 and 1845, also of a
Customs Agreement in 1846, by which transhipment dues on cargo were
fixed in general at 5 per cent., special provision being made for landing dues
in the case of distressed or injuiWl vessels, while stores, the property of
the British Government, were exempted from duty altogether. In 1854
Sa'id transferred the Kuria Muria Islands to the British crown by a deed
of gift, and refused to accept any quid pro quo: the islands were valuable
on account of the guano with which they were then covered, and which
the French had made several efforts to obtain.
Ceremonial courtesies were from time to time exchanged between
Sa'id and His Britannic Majesty. The Saiyid, about 1836, presented King
William with the " Liverpoola fine ship of war but too large for the
service of Masqat, receiving in return a handsome yacht, the " Prince
Regent and in 1838 he sent a mission to England to congratulate Queen
Victoria on her accession, on which occasion also an interchange of
valuable gifts took place. A less agreeable court incident was the
clandestine departure for England in 1845 of Sa'id's eldest son, Hilal,
for whom he entertained an unaccountable aversion, and whom he had
clearly manifested his intention of excluding from the succession. The
young man succeeded in making some political interest in England, but
his friends were unable to influence the Saiyid in his favour, and he even
tually died a refugee at Aden in 1851.
At the beginning of Sard's reign British political interests were
represented at Masqat by a European officer; but, after the death of three
successive Residents from the effects of the climate, viz., of Lieutenant
Watts in 1808 and of Captain Seton and Mr. Bunce in 1809, the place
was adjudged too unhealthy for permanent occupation and was placed
instead under the supervision of the Resident at Bushehr. In April
1840, however, in connection with the Egyptian danger, a British
Resident (Captain Hamerton) was re -appointed to Masqat; but the
Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. was soon afterwards removed to Zanzibar, where it remained
till after the death of Sa'id.
39 a
Comrnercial
and other
treaties with
Britain,
and cession
of the Kuria
Muria Is
lands.
Eelations of
Saiyid Sa'id
with the
British
Court.
Britieli politi
cal represen
tation at
Masqat.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎467] (610/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00000b> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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