Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎511] (654/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

-"'"x
lll(
*
■K
His military
resource#.
5X1
longer favoured the Hinawi tribes but rather returned to dependence
on the Ghafiris ; he paid more attention to the efficiency of his own
military resources; and he utilised the services of his own relations
and of other respectable men more freely in the administration.
The re -enlistment of foreign mercenaries, Hasawis and Najdis,
while it made the Sultan almost independent in his capital of tribal
support, was not an unmixed benefit ; for the soldiery were prone to
factions among themselves, and the behaviour of those among them who
were Wahhabis was apt to be truculent. In 1879 the chief of the
Hasawis at Masqat was murdered by the N ajdis, and the feai of an
armed struggle between the two corps was so great that H.M.S.
" Beacon " was sent to strengthen the authority of the Sultan. In 1881
a Hindu merchant was shot dead at Matrah, and so strongly did the
Hindu community believe this murder to be the work oi the Sultan s
Wahhabi guard that they petitioned the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. to take steps foi
its disbandment. In 1882 a daring robbery of a Kbojah British subject
was committed by a Wahhabi soldier at Mat rah, and some difficulty
was experienced by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. in obtaining reparation.
The naval position of the Sultan was extremely weak after his hjb n»val
return from Gwadar, during his sojourn at which place he bad dis^
posed of his only vessel, the corvette " Hahmani, by selling hei at
Bombay. In 1876 Turki solicited the help of the British Government
in obtaining a steam-vessel, the cost of the same to be deducted by
instalments from the "Zanzibar ' subsidy; but the request was not
favourably entertained. In the end, however, Turki received the steam
yacht u Dar-as-Salamas a gift from his brother the Sultan uf Zanzibar
and she seems to have been of considerable service in strengthening his
control over the coast.
Turki's principal minister throughout this period of his reign was His public
Sa J id-bin-Muhammad, the brother of his original ilMated Wazir, Thuwami
bin-Muhammad. Entire confidence did not, however, exist between the
Sultan and Sa'id ; moreover the latter was the enemy of Badar-bin baif, a
consistent supporter of Turki who had governed Sohar as Wali t^ei since
its capture in 1873. In consequence largely of the intrigues of Sa id,
Badar was removed from Sohar in 1878 and banished to Zanzibar, but
Turki in 1879 allowed him to return to 'Oman and appointed him gover
nor of Matrah. Turki discovered a useful servant in a certain Sulaiman-
bin-Suwailim, whom, from 1879 onwards, he employed chiefly m Dhufar.
With most of his near relatives, except his brother 'Abdul ; Aziz, Hia relation
Turki was on friendly terms; but in 1876, on suspicion of intrigue, he

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎511] (654/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000037> [accessed 19 October 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000037">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;511] (654/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000037">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0654.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image