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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎518] (661/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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518
and condoned his conduct; and the temporary loss of Suwaiq in the follow-
ing- month, already mentioned, was an indirect consequence of the
injury to his prestige resulting- from the Birkat-al-Moz incident.
pecTen ed 8 * Turki's mind, in his last days, was somewhat unhinged by his suffer-
by Turki to- ing-^ and about a month before his death he even dismissed his Wazir
of his reign. Sa'id-bin-M uhammad on suspicion of practising sorcery against his
life ; but otherwise; during the concluding years of his reign, Turki
enjoyed a reputation for sound judgment in tribal affairs and for skill
in the management of his Arab subjects. He conciliated the people and
kept before his eyes the Arab ideal of a sovereign,—that of a Shaikh
of Shaikhs, primus inter pares : in short he was a weak, but not an
evil, ruler.
Special Relations of Turki with the British (government,
1883-88.
Undertaking
by the Gov
ernment of
India to up.
hold Saiyid
Turki in re
pelling un
provoked
aggression, and
conferment ( j {\
him of the
Q.C.S.I,
1886.
The financial support of the British Government was continued by
means of the a Zanzibar " subsidy, a check being however imposed on
the granting of advances of the same by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. on hie
own responsibility ; and a marked extension was given to the policy of
armed assistance to the Sultan in his difficulties.
In 1885, when rumours of disaffection in the Sharqiyah district
once more became rife, it was suggested by Colonel Ross, the British
Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Gulf, that an explicit announcement should
be made to all concerned that the British Government would not allow
attacks upon the towns of Masqat and Matrah, where British subjects
possessed valuable interests, to be permanently successful, but would,
if necessary, expel the rebels who occupied them and replace Saiyid Turki
in possession. Colonel Ross argued that use and wont had made it
impossible to decline future requests from Turki for armed assistance,
d that, such being the case, it would be well to declare clearly the
policy of Government, inasmuch as the mere declaration would probably
ce to pie\ent attacks on the capital ; the guarantee, however, should
e personal to Turki and should not extend to his successors. The Gov-
t of India, leposing confidence in Colonel Ross's knowledge of the
t on and in the soundness of his judgment, authorised an announce-
men o ie Sultan, and to his rivals and enemies, that the British Gov-
ernmen a for especial reasons resolved to uphold Saiyid Turki in

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎518] (661/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00003e> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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