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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎533] (676/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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/'7 -
iZ*'-
1
L' 1S>
rtlyto '
faslltfal,
P^rastimiii h k
nextnngsii^^,
aI1| l Suspicion [jg,
Ijis posiiir:
t>t
: acceptiiig lis te; I
sntations tytkS^.
property. It ^ i
ic request of tie Ea |
mid be tlie niii ■ |
IgeDcy: tleiatf.
i. Saind Fa® k
ier SaTid ^
3port of SaH-yj
en he aliffiawi 11 ■
of the UMk
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lis control of
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533
of estrangement was gradual, and no marked disagreement occurred untU
after the fioal departure in March 1891 of Colonel Ross, whose experience
as Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Gulf extended back over 18 years.
Saiyid Faisal, on first assuming the administration, expressed a hope
(hat the friendship of the British Government might be continued to
him, solicited their protection, aud promised steadfastly to carry out their
wishes. On the advice of Colonel Ross tormai recognition ct the new
Saltan was postponed, but payment to him of the "Zanzibar" subsidy
was not suspended. The Government of India, in recommending the
continuance of the subsidy, took the opportunity to suggest that, as m
former times, a part of it should be made chargeable to Her Majesty s
Government; but no alteration of the existing arrangements was obtained.
In 1888, during this period of undefined relations and iu connection with
his operations against 'Awabi, Faisal requested the support of H.M.S.
« Turquoise " on the Batinah coast, but it was not granted ; and about t c
same time both 'Abdul 'Aziz aud Ibrahim-bin-Qais wrote to inquire
whether Saiyid Faisal would be supported by the British Government in
the same manner as his father,—a query to which the Resident returne
a very guarded reply.
In the spring of 1889 the formal recognition of Faisal's Sultanate,
reeommended by the Resident and the Government of India, was
authorised by the Secretary of State ; but Colonel Ross, findiugon anna
at Masqat that fresh dangers threatened the new ruler from ic 811 ' |iy
region, refrained from making the announcement which had been the
object of his visit, and reported the circumstances of 13 a s
the Government of India. At length ou the 6th of
Darter and in the presence of His Highuess's brothers -d the principal
inhabitants of Masqat, Colonel Ross informed Sa, y ld ^ of
recognition as Sultan % the British Paisal in
21 guns was fired from the R.I.M. • * ^ in ^ im p 0r tant
his reply expressed his earnest desne g . i ^
"matters of policy by the advice of the British Government nd so to
" conduct the government as to secure the continued lien s up ^
" bation of His Excellency the Viceroy and the Bntis oveiumen .
The first item of business —
formal recognition wa^ the conclusion o Trpatv of
Commerce and Navigation, to take the place of the Treaty o
Commerce of 1889. The arrangement of a fresh treaty, on tbe m d
of one recently concluded with Zanzibar, had been suggested^ by Colonel
Ross in 1887, but proceedings were postponed by the ea o
Recognition
of Faisal by
the British
Government
postpon ed,
1888.
Faisal recog
nised by the
British
Government,
April 1890.
British Com-
meroial
Treaty, 1891.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎533] (676/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00004d> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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