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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎587] (730/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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587
further-reaching than at any previous period in the reign of Saiyid Faisal
himself or, perhaps, it might be added in the reign of his father Saiyid
Turki. After 1900 the Sultan showed more energy than before in touring
and in the general work of government; and, as in the case of his father
and grand-father, his judgment gained in balance and his character in
weight and sobriety with the lapse of years. Like Saiyid Turki, how
ever, Saiyid Faisal was subject to fits of despondency ; and in 1903 before
the Viceroy's visit, and once again later, he was so harrassed by the cares
of state as to talk seriously of abdication. The assassination of Salaiman-
bin-Suwaihm in 1907 was a severe blow to the Sultan, and the first
news of that event was received by him with consternation.
From the dynastic point of view the situation in 'Oman was not Dynastic
unsatisfactory. In 1903 Muhammad, the elder brother of Saiyid Sir
Faisal^ in whose favour he was passed over in 1888, showed that he enter
tained hopes of the succession in case the Sultan should predecease him
or resign j but he had no following, and his ambitious ideas were dis
couraged by the British representatives from the first moment of their
appearance. Saiyid 'Abdul 'Aziz, the uncle of the present Sultan, died
at Bombay in April 1907, and his heirs were so little formidable to Saiyid
Sir Faisal and his family that their return to Masqat was permitted
without hesitation. Since 1903 it had been clear that the Rustaq
branch of the A1 Bu Sa'idi family equally did not possess any
strong member likely to become a dangerous competitor for the
throne of 'Oman ; and interest therefore centred chiefly in Saiyid
Taimur, the eldest surviving son of the Sultan, who had always
been treated as heir-apparent. Saiyidah 'Alaiyah, the mother of Taimur,
was a daughter of the former Sultan Thuwaini-bin-Sa id, and t -ie
pedigiee of the youth was thus unexceptionable upon the maternal side.
Saiyid Taimur may be considered to have entered on public life in
1901 a; the age of 16, when on returning from a tour in the interior
he was received by his father with a salute of 13 guns and on the fol
lowing day paid a visit alone to the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. . In
December 1904 he was married to a daughter of 'Ali-bin-Sahm-bm*
Thuwaini,* a second cousin once removed of his own; a complimentary
*'Ali-bin-Salim first arrived in 1898 from Zanzibar, whence he had been
expelled for political intrigues, and lived at Masqat for some years upon the bounty
of the Sulian; eventually, in the beginning of 1904, the Government of Zan Zl b»r,
in etmseqience of a request made by Saiyid Faisal to Lord Curzon during the visit
of tfce lattjr to Masqat in 1903, agreed to permit his return to East Africa. Ali-
bin-Salim, however, shortly sought leave to go back to Masqat, and it was grante
him in September 1904.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎587] (730/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000083> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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