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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎615] (758/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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616
Early nii»bo-
liaviour of
tlie tribe,
1875-76.
Serious Hind
episode at
Gwadar,
1879.
The trouble at Gwadar between the Rinds and the representatives of Causes of the
Saiyid Turki was intensified—if it was not created—by the treaty for the Emd trouble *
abolition of the slave trade signed by the Sultan in 1873, in which he
bound himself to make free all persons entering his territories from
without; and the liberation of slaves who took refuge at Gwadar, strict
observance of the treaty being insisted on by the British Assistant
Political Ao'ent there, soon became a serious grievance in the eyes of the
Rinds and other slave-owning tribes of the vicinity.
In 1875 some Rinds made a small raid upon a caravan travelling
from Gwadar to Balm, and the whole tribe were as a punishment exclu
ded from the town for six months by order of the Arab \\ ali; but the
effects of this blockade seem to have fallen chiefly upon the trade of
Gwadar itself, and the Sultan found it necessary to appease the merch
ants and the customs farmer by paying them compensation out _ of his
own pocket. In 1876 a party of Rinds, incensed by the manumission ot
some of their slaves at Gwadar, vowed vengeance^ against^ the British
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ; twice cut the telegraph wire in the neighbouihood;
abducted a telegraph employe, who was however released after two or
three days' detention ; and committed other offences chiefly against the
British telegraph establishment.
After this outbreak, minor outrages continued to occur from time to
time, and in June 1879 feeling was much embittered by an unfortunate
fracas in Gwadar town which resulted m the death of three Rmds,
members of a party whom the Wali had ordered to appear before him and
Who had attempted to resist his mandate by force. Seven prisoners taken
by the Wali on the same occasion were released on an agreement that no
reprisals should be made, and that the tribe should
tions in future ; but the incident was not forgotten by the Kinds, w
more than once afterwards threatened to institute a ret a l i at ory blo o d-feud,
not only against the Arab Government but also against the But ish
telegraph establishment. The situation S 1 '^- ^^p^flpiit in the
time by Captain Durand, First Assistant to the Po ^ cal
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , who arrived at Gwadar while the matter of seven tod
prisoners was still pending before the ^ all ; he 1 . tiTe measures
that the temerity of the Kinds was increasing, an a l 111 ^ ^ appre-
o! some sort were required for the restoration^ M g « Ready ^
hension during what was locally regardec /"'Y o r -; ( ; s h subiects and their
was sent for a time to Gwadar to protect British subjects
property. ,
: trade of G wadar with
increasing at this time ; it was ma • ■ l , , ,
subiects, who now numbered 50 or 60 house io •
In 1880 there was a lull in the ^ ^ of that year, how-
more serious cases occurred until 1883. f .,f Gwadar on a visit to
ever, while Saiyid Turki was personal y Rinds ou a telegraph
the place, an attack was in f le ^ 1 resu ited in the kidnapping
party at Sarchib, 57 miles west oi Gwa < , conS iderable amount of
of a telegraph Jamadar and ^ eanym^ The Kind
property, some of which belonged to tl rg alK l the primary
country had suffered from scarcity dm ing tnice yea ,
Recrudes
cence of lb 6
Kind trouble,
1883.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎615] (758/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00009f> [accessed 20 October 2018]

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