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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎678] (821/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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f'
678
Questions
relating to
the inter
pretation of
the Treaty,
1823.
in regard to the interpretation of the General Treaty of Peace, of
which document even the simplest requirements did not appear to be
universally understood ; and the free and friendly intercourse thus estab
lished inaugurated a new epoch in the history of British dealings with the
Pirate Coast. Incidentally, Lieutenant McLeod sought to dissuade
Shaikh Sultan-bin-Saqar of Sharjah from hostilities against the ruler
of Masqat, for in his opinion a state of war between these two, of whom
the former possessed the greater military strength and had less to lose,
while the latter was the more wealthy, was fraught with grave danger
to the safety of seas; and he concerted measures with the Shaikh
of Abu Dhabi to compel Suwaidan-bin-Za'al, a dangerous maritime
wanderer with a large following, to adopt a more settled mode of
life. As a marine survey of this part of the Gulf, recommended by
General Sir W. Grant Keir before his departure, was now in progress,
the Resident took the opportunity afforded by his cruise to visit the
scene of operations. Between Sharjah and Dohah in Qatar the squadron
took a still unsurveyed passage.
One measure now recommended by the Political Res-"dent was the
establishment of a Native Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. at Sharjah, if necessary by the
transfer of a Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. who was then maintained at Qatif; and
the proposal appears to have been carried into effect soon afterwards.
Connected with the Treaty of 1820 were a number of doubtful
points, certain of which, raised for the most part by the perverse
ingenuity of Sultan-bin-Saqar, the Resident now referred to Government
for an authoritative decision. Before the removal of the troops from Qishm,
Colonel Kennett being then the political officer at that place, two other
questions had been agitated,—whether the British authorities had
the right to enquire into the building of new vessels at the piratical
ports and to destroy them on the stocks in event of the explanation
given being unsatisfactory, and whether it was permissible fo detain
the vessels of signatory states if not possessed of the papers or flying
the flag required by the treaty of 1820 : in both cases the decision
appears to have been iu the negative. The principal points now
discussed were the competence of the British authorities to forbid the
building or rebuilding of fortifications by chiefs, the scope of the
ai ic e (No. 9) relating lo the slave trade, and the extent to which
under another article (No. 10) Ihc British Government was pledged to
protect the paciflcated Arabs against the attacks of non-signatory
powers. It W as ruled with reference to these, in March 1823, that the
erm. ot the treaty did not warrant any prohibition of the building
1 ."j

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎678] (821/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000016> [accessed 16 August 2018]

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