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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎695] (838/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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> 'v-v ■»v' • v 'x- •"
695
proposed by Captain Hennell that they should agree to a Maritime
Truce to cover the season of the approaching pearl fishery.
This suggestion having met with general acceptance, a more formal
meeting was held at the Bushehr Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. on the 21st August 1835,
and here a document was sealed by or on behalf of the Shaikhs of
Sharjah, Dibai, 'Ajman and Abu Dhabi, whereby they bound themselves
to observe an inviolable truce from the 21st of May to the 21st of
November of the same year, during which period all claims should
remain in abeyance ; to afford redress for any infraction of the truce by
their respective subjects ; and, in case of any aggression being committed
upon their subjects, not to retaliate, but to report the matter to the
British political or naval authorities. The Resident on his part was
careful to explain to the parties, before execution of the agreement, that
any breach of the truce, when once established, would be treated as a
case of piracy, and that no regard would be paid to the existence of a
state of war on land.
The Shaikh of Bahrain, who was amenable to British influence and
between whom and the Saiyid of 'Oman there was at the time a
prospect of war, was not invited to subscribe to the Truce; but every
where its conclusion was hailed with delight by those interested in the
pearl trade,— in some cases almost the entire population. The importance
of Captain Hennell's achievement may be judged by the fact that, before
this, some of the pearl merchants of Sharjah had actually offered to pay
^ a year to the British Government for each pearl boat of which the
safety at sea ?hculd be guaranteed.
From 1835 onwards " Trucial 'Oman " becomes the most appropriate
name for the country hitherto known as the Pirate Coast, and it«
chiefs may henceforth be correctly described as " the Trucial Shaikhs.
Another suggestion made by Captain Hennell in 183o and well Tbe^ ^ ^
received by the Shaikhs was that, for the protection of neutral commerce, Xiine,
a portion of the Gulf on the Persian side should be placed out of bounds 1886k
for tribal warfare, even at the times when no truce existed. On the
recommendation of Captain Hennell the Bombay Government agreed
that the cruising of Arabian war-boats nearer to the Persian coast than
the islands of Bu Musa and Sirri should at all times be interdicted ; but
Major Morison, who succeeded Captain Hennell, was able to arrange
with the Shaikhs for the substitution of Sir Bu Na air in place of the
islands previously mentioned, by which means the area liable to istur
bance was still further reduced.
In consequence of some irregular proceedings on the part of the
Shaikh of Bahrain the restrictive line was afterwards authoritatively

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎695] (838/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000027> [accessed 19 August 2018]

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