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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎817] (972/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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817
interference on the mainland ; but it was not apparently necessary for
no visible results followed from the n&w combination. In 1877 there
were complaints, as described in the l^story of Bahrain, that Shaikh
'Isa still maintained undesirably close relations with Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. ; but
enquiry showed that he was not, in fact,, doing more than was required
to keep the Na im upon his side and to prevent their joining the Bani
Hajir.
In September 1878, a S related in the history of Hasa, a heinous Dealruotioa
piracy, accompanied by the murder of four persons, was committed by the of z «barah!
inhabitants of Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. upon a passing boat; and Colonel Ross, the 1878 '
Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , was directed by the Government of India to demand
of the Turkish authorites that the place should be punished, and to offer
British naval assistance for the purpose. These instructions he executed
by starting on the 32nd of October in person for Basrah, where he had
a not unsatisfactory meeting with the Wali, 'Abdullah Pasha. In the
meantime, or immediately afterwards, Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. , of which the inhabi
tants had made themselves obnoxious to all their neighbours by raids
and piracies, was attacked by a large force under Shaikh Jaeim of
Dohah and Nasir-bin-Mubarak, Colonel Ross, on becoming aware of
this new complication, at once proceeded from Bushehr to Bahrain, where
he arrived on the 17th of November in H.M.S. " Teazer/' H.MS
" Arab " being already anchored there. Shaikh 'Isa came on board
and earnestly besought that some action should be taken in favour of the
Na'im; but the Resident's reply was a refusal, at which he appeared
greatly dissatisfied. On the 18th of November Colonel Ross landed
at Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. from the f 'Teazer " and visited the camp of Shaikh Jasim,
pitched about half a mile from the square fort of Murair, in which
the Na im, to the number of about 500 souls, were besieged ; the
village of Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. proper was already completely in ruins/ and
it was said that some boats had been burnt. The force with Shaikh
Jasim appeared to number about 2,000 armed men ; and, in con
sequence of the disparity in numbers between the attackers and the
attacked, there had been no actual fighting. On his return to Bahrain
Colonel Ross found a telegram from his acquaintance, the Wali of Basrah,
to the Qaim-Maqam of Qatif, in which the latter was directed to send the
gunboat " Iskanderia >} immediately to Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. in order to prevent any
attempt by the besieging force to invade Bahrain ; and this order he
at once forwarded to its destination. The Na'im besieged in Murair sur
rendered, on unfavourable terms, not long after Colonel Ross's departure,
and Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. as a populated place ceased to exist; the inhabitants,
61

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎817] (972/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x0000ad> [accessed 15 November 2018]

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