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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎1001] (1156/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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i event, st 1
lers, b
'sr-rl
11
1001
Sulaimaii-bin-Ahmad ; and the Al Subali enjoyed some sort of political
predominance over the other divisions o£ the tribe. According to another
authority the chief Shaikh of the Al Subah at the time of the foundation
of Kuwait was one Rahim.
In the first fifty years after its foundation, the town of Kuwait grew
rapidly in wealth and importance ; and the 'Utub, partly by means of
matrimonial alliances with other tribes in the neighbourhood, succeeded
in making their position good against the Bani Khalid, who till shortly
before had dominated the whole north-eastern coast of Arabia. Ihe
chief of Kuwait from about 1756 to about 1762 was Shaikh Subah, who
was succeeded by his son, Shaikh 'Abdullah.
In 1758, when Dr. Ives and his party passed through Kharag on
their way from India to Europe, friendly relations prevailed between
Baron Kniphausen, the head of the Dutch settlement on Kharag, and
the Shaikh of Kuwait, " a man greatly obliged to him, and in some
measure under his influence^; and it occurred to the Baron that
arrangements might be made through the Shaikh for the British travel
lers to accompany a caravan proceeding from Kuwait by the desert to
Aleppo—a route which, though more arduous, was shorter in time than
that by Basrah and Baghdad. A boat was accordingly sent, on the 31st
of March, to fetch the Shaikh from Kuwait to Kharag ; but he did not
make his appearance until the 14th of April 3 and his demands, when he
came, were so extortionate and so firmly maintained as to make the
Baron secretly doubtful of the expediency of the plan which he had
himself proposed. The British party, on becoming aware of this, relieved
him from his embarrassment by suggesting that, for various reasons,
they should continue their journey by the Basrah -Baghdad route.
In 1766, in circumstances of which no explanation except one probably
fanciful is extant, the Al Khalifah division of the 'Utub separated
themselves from the rest of the tribe and removed to Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. in Qatar,
where they became an independent colony. They were followed, after a
short interval, by the Jalahimah ; and the Al Subah remained in exclusive
possession of Kuwait.
Friendly relations between the 'Utub of Kuwait and those .of
Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. must, if ever interrupted, have shortly been resumed, for in
1776 one of the Shaikhs and a number of the chief inhabitants of
Kuwait took refuge at Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. in consequence of the capture of Basrah
by the Persians. The fall of Basrah did not, however, injure Kuwait;
on the contrary, a considerable part of the trade of Basrah was
diverted, during the Persian occupation of that place, to Kuwait.
Rapid growth
of the
settlement,
1716-fiG.
Relations of
tho Dutch at
Kharag with
the Shaikh
of Kuwait,
1758.
Emigvation
of the Al
Khalifah and
Jalahimah
from Kuwait
to Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha.
in Qatar,
1766.
Effect on
Kuwait of
the capture
of Basrah by
the Persians,
1776-79.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎1001] (1156/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575946.0x00009d> [accessed 13 November 2018]

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