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‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Agency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1883-84.’ [‎36r] (11/166)

The record is made up of 1 volume (87 folios). It was created in 1884. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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BESIDENCT AND MUSCAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. FOE 1883-84.
9
the residence of Asad Khan, Governor of the district of Dizful. The town is the most populous
one in Arabistan, though fallen into decay, and numbers some 12,000 inhabitants. The revenue
of town and district amounts to 400,000 krans.
50. Muhammerah, —Muhammerah, with its dependent districts, is governed by Shaikh
Mizal, whose elder brother, Mohammed, is still detained at Isphahan. Shaikh Mizal seems to
have succeeded fairly well in establishing his authority.
51. In May 1883 the Prince Ihtishan-es-Saltanah arrived at Muhammerah with a
regiment of Sirbaz,
52. In August the Nasar tribe of Arabs, a branch of the Beni Ka'b, revolted against
Shaikh Mizal Khan, and shut themselves up in a mud fort, which Shaikh Mizal besieged.
Eventually, after some casualties on both sides, the Hasan submitted and came to terms. This
success greatly strengthened Shaikh Mizal Khan's position and led to establishment of tranquil
lity and good order in his districts.
53. The revenue paid by Shaikh Mizal to the Persian Government for the Muhammerah
district is 450,000 krans.
54. It was proposed to establish a Custom House at Muhammerah under Persian manage
ment, and the Sa'ad-ul-Mulk visited Muhammerah in view to arranging the matter. This was,
of course, a very distasteful project to the Arabs, and Shaikh Mizal succeeded in having it
abandoned for the present.
55. Felahiyah. —District, under (nominally) Shaikh Eamah, pays a revenue of 150,000
krans.
56. Haweza. —Chief, Moolah Matlab : pays 230,000 krans.
57. Dae-ul-Moollah. —Chief, Meer Abdullah : pays 120,000 krans.
58. Ramis, or Ram-Hormzd. —Pays 140,000 krans.
59. Shushter. —The town of Shushter, formerly an important one and excellently situated,
is now in ruins. The Governor is Mirza Asadullah Khan, and the revenue of town and district
is 230,000 krans,
7.—PERSIAN BELOOCHISTAN AND GWADUR.
60. During the year the notorious sirteep Ibrahim Khan, of Bam, was reinstated as
Governor of Bampoor and Persian Beloochistan, and from all districts there came reports of
distress, the population emigrating in numbers to India and elsewhere.
61. The claims (referred to in last year's report) at Charbar for losses caused by the mis
conduct of troops under Meer Hoosain Khan of Sirbas ■ were, after firm pressure had been
brought to bear by Her Majesty's Minister at the Court of Persia, paid in full by the Gover
nor of Kirman.
62. The Persian authorities of Kirman denied the truth of the report of the murder of an
Indian in Baho, mentioned in last report, but further investigation was promised.
63. The Chiefs of Baho and Dashtyaree were reinstated in their districts, but Meer Deen
Mohammed, Chief of Dashtyaree, was fined 6,000 tomans 10,000 Persian dinars, or a gold coin of that value. , and had to give his sons as hostages
or security for payment. He himself went on a begging tour to 'Oman and Sind to raise money
to pay the fine.
64. Some annoyances were caused to the Telegraph employes in the district of Meer Hotee,
Chief of Gaih, and steps were taken to compel that Chief to afford satisfaction,
GWADUR.
65. In January Major E. Mockler proceeded from Busrah on special duty to Mekran to
meet Colonel Sir Robert Sandeman, whose Mission reached Gwadur in February.
66. Lieutenant-Colonel Miles, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat, also visited Gwadur in Her
Majesty's Ship Dragon in February.
67. Mr. B. Flinch, Director, Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Telegraph, was in Political charge of the
Mekran coast during the year.
8.—BASSIDORE.
68. On account of extreme unhealthiness of late of this station the guard of the 21st
Regiment, N. I., or Marine Battalion hitherto kept there, was transferred to Bushire. The
2

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Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for the year 1883-84, by Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , published by Authority by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Ross to Charles Grant, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 17 July 1884, is included in the report (folio 33), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Report ), written by Ross (folios 34-39), containing summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: Oman and the Pirate Coast; Bahrain; Nejd, El-Hasa [Al-Hasa] and El-Katr [Qatar]; Fars, including Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh] and Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], and the coast between Bushire and Bandar-e Lengeh; Persian Arabistan; Persian Beloochistan [Baluchistan] and Gwadur; and Bassidore. The report also contains summaries of changes in official personnel (referred to as political establishment); British naval movements in the Gulf; and a summary of meteorological events observed at the Bushire observatory. Appendix A contains tabulated and graphical meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Administration Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for the year 1883-84 ), submitted by Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Barrett Miles, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, dated 9 June 1884 (folios 40-50), containing a summary of affairs at Muscat, including raids and fighting around Muscat in October 1884, between rebel forces and those allied to the Sultan of Muscat. The report also records changes to British official personnel at Muscat, and notes recent shipwrecks on the Muscat coast. Appendix A is a biographical sketch, written by Miles, of Sayyid Sa'eed-bin-Sultan, the Imam of Muscat.

Part 3 ( Report on Trade for the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for 1883 , folios 50-105), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade, and followed by two appendices, labelled A and B, but arranged in reverse order: B) Supplementary notes on the care and culture of date trees and fruit, written by A. R. Hakim, Assistant to the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. ; A) tabulated data on trade, including data on imports and exports into and out of the Gulf ports of Bushire, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab (Oman) coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folios 53-54.

Part 4 (

[at Muscat]), submitted by Miles, dated 9 June 1884 (folios 105-12), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and an appendix containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (87 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data after each. Two appendices following part two of the report are labelled in reverse order (B then A, instead of A then B).

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 32, and ends on the last folio, on number 112.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Agency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1883-84.’ [‎36r] (11/166), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/45, No 198, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023580328.0x00000d> [accessed 14 April 2024]

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