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‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1884-85.’ [‎12r] (19/130)

The record is made up of 1 volume (63 folios). It was created in 1885. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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EESIDENCT AND MUSCAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOE 1884-85.
17
PAUT II.
ADMINISTRATION UEPOKT OF THE MUSCAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOR
1884-1S85.
Political.—The close of the year 1883 saw the re-establishment of His Highness Seyyid
Toorkee's prestige aud the vindication of his authority by the suppression of his brother's
rebellion. In the present year under review. His Highnesses position has been still further
strengthened by the recovery of two fortresses, one on the coast and the other in the interior,
which had been for a long time in the hands of disaffected Chiefs.
In April 1884, the Sultan being dissatisfied with the conduct of Sheikh Muhammad-bin-
Nasir, El Ruahy, invited him to Muscat, intending to replace him at Zikki by a more obedient
and devoted adherent. Sheikh Muhammad came as far as Semail, but having his suspicions
aroused returned thence to his fort.
In this month the Beni Battash, a powerful tribe in El Sharkiyeh, which had for some
time been estranged, became reconciled to His Higfeness.
In May a second attempt was made to induce Sheikh Muhammad Nasir to visit Muscat,
and this time with better success. Having received a promise of safety, and believing the word
of the envoys, he presented himself before the Sultan, by whom he was immediately imprisoned.
Sheikh Muhammad then agreed to surrender the fort of Zikki on certain terms ; but 1 e ® e
being made known to the tribe, the latter became indignant at the treatment of their Sheikh,
and repudiated the agreement.
On the 22nd May, the most learned and influential Metowwa or priest in Oman, Muham-
mad-El-Gharibi, died at Khudthra in the Batineh.
On the 26th, letters and rumours reached Muscat of an intended rising on the part of the
Sharkiyeh tribes under the leadership of Sheikh Saleh. A raid on the Batineh coast was also
contemplated by Skeikli Hamood-^l-Jahafee ; but these miscbief-mabers failed to i-eeeive the
support they expected, aud their schemes ultimately fell through.
Ou the 26th Juue, the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. proceeded to the Batmeh in Her Majesty s ship
Dragon, to assure himself of the safety of Indian British subjects residing on that coast.
In July, a serious conflict took place between the Harth and Mesakereb tribes of El Shar
kiyeh, which are constantly at feud, in which about 20 men were killed and wounded.
The Sultan received a visit on the Mth of the following month from Sheikh Tahnoon-
bin -Zaeed- bin-Khalifa, who arrived from Abutbabee by sea.
After several ineffectual missions and much correspondence, the negociations with the
Beni Ruweyheb for the surrender of the fort at Zikki, were at length brought to a successful
termination through the mediation of the people of Nakhal, and Sheikh Muhammad was
released from confinement on the 4th September. By agreement the tribe received a sum o
at 500 for giving up the fort. The fort was entrusted by the Sultan to Sule.mau-bin-
Suweylim, who was despatched from Muscat with a garrison to rece.ve charge.
In this month the Wazir, Seyyid Saeed, proceeded to Soor in the Dar-el-Salaam and
effected an arrangement with the Jenebeh about the payment of customs duties and
erection of a wall round the town.
On the 4th October, the fort of Soweyk was yielded up to the Sultan by Saood-bm-Seyf,
Beni Ruweyheh on payment of $500.
About the same time Sheikh Hilal -bin-Zahir of Nezwa raided the Jenebeh at Rakkeh in
the Province of Oman, and inflicted a loss of ten killed on that tribe.
o ^ qicf Optober the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. arrived at Muscat and
had an 'interview with the Sultan on the subject of Gwudur affairs. The Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency.
left Muscat to return to Bushire on the 3rd November.
bit In W the officers appointed by His Highness to receive charge of the fort appearing, they
were refused admittance. , , j £ u*
The Sultan's son, Muhammad, having expressed a desire at this time to be relieved of is
governship at Sobar, Seyyid Hamad -bin Nasir was appointed to relieve him, and Seyyid
Muhammad returned to Muscat on the 6th December.

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Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for the year 1884-85, published by Authority by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , to Henry Mortimer Durand, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 18 May 1885, is included in the report (folio 5), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Summary ), written by Ross, dated 30 April 1885 (folios 6-11), containing summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: Oman and the Pirate Coast; Bahrain; Nejd, El-Hasa [Al-Hasa] and El-Katr [Qatar]; Fars; Persian Arabistan; Persian Baluchistan; and Bassidore. The report also records a marked increase in the slave trade to the Gulf from Africa; summaries of changes in official personnel; British naval movements in the Gulf; and a summary of meteorological events observed at the Bushire observatory. Appendix A contains tabulated and graphical meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Administration Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for the year 1884-85 ), submitted by Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Barrett Miles, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat (folios 12-23), containing a summary of affairs at Muscat, and an additional short report on the revival of the slave trade between Muscat and Zanzibar, a likely result, suggests Miles, of the departure of HMS London from Zanzibar. Appendix A is a report of Miles’s visit to Ras Fartak. Appendix B is an historical sketch, also written by Miles, on the Portuguese in Eastern Arabia.

Part 3 ( Report on Trade for the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for 1884 ), written by Ross and dated April 1885 (folios 24-59), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade, with notes on: grain; opium; cotton; tobacco; imported goods; the increase in piece goods; sugar; the activities of European firms in the Gulf; steamers; the Dutch Commercial Treaty; trade routes; naphtha springs; and pearl fishing. Appendix A comprises tabulated data on import, exports and revenue, in the Gulf ports of Bushire, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab (Oman) coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folios 25-26.

Part 4 (Trade [at Muscat]), submitted by Miles (folios 59-66), comprising a short summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and an appendix containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (63 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data after each part.

Physical characteristics

Condition: Some tears and holes in the paper, but not sufficient to impair legibility. Fold-out at f 10.

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 4, and ends on the last folio, on number 66.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Report on the administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1884-85.’ [‎12r] (19/130), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/47, No 207, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023600941.0x000015> [accessed 18 August 2019]

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