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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎49v] (7/60)

The record is made up of 1 volume (29 folios). It was created in 1889. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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6
ADMINISTRATION EEPORT OF THE PERSIAN GULP POLITICAL
7. Seyyid Abdul 'Azeez -bin-Sa'eed, a younger brother of the late Seyyid
Turki, has for many years resided in Central'Oman in a straitened condition,
living in hopes of eventually succeeding to the Sultanate. It was naturally
expected that this aspirant would speedily appear in the field, and attack his
nephews. But "the unexpected" once more prevailed. Either from want of
money or of the support of the Sharkiyah tribes, or from unknown causes, no
movement of the sort has hitherto occurred, and, as time went on, the adherence
of Salih bin Ali El-Harthi and others, with absence of any opposition to
Seyyid Feysal, seemed to indicate that the latter was practically the elect of
the people, and had thus fulfilled the conditions qualifying him for formal
recognition as Sultan.
8. The expedition undertaken by Seyyid Feysal against his cousin
Ibrahim-bin-Kais, its failure, and his failing to come to, or keep to terms with
Ibrahim are circumstances which have damaged Seyyid Fey sal's prestige and
weakened his position. He has further neglected to strengthen himself by
gathering round him persons of weight, and seeking counsel of experienced
advisers. From his assumption of power until May 1889 His Highness
appointed no one to be his Wazeer or Minister, transacting all business per
sonally or through writers of no standing.
9. Having visited Muscat in April 1889, it appeared to me that, owing to
circumstances, such as above indicated, Seyyid Fey sal's position had become
more insecure than at the outset, and that his formal recognition had better be
postponed. This alteration in the opinion previously expressed by me was con
sequent on information received at Muskat.
10. The death of Seyyid Turki is felt to be a misfortune to 'Oman; for,
although his rule was by no means vigorous, he was well skilled in managing
Arabs, and usually mild and liberal. His loyalty to the British Government
w T as sincere and unswerving. Whatever his vacillations in other matters, from
this policy he never departed, namely full trust in, and devotion to, the British
power. This well-known loyalty was recognized by Her Majesty conferring
on His Highness in 1886 the Grand Cross of the Star of India, and at the same
time the British Government undertook to afford him active support during
his life-time, in case of insurrections and attacks on Muscat. This announce
ment ensured the maintenance of peace at Muscat so long as Seyyid Turki
should continue to reign, and makes his loss the more felt.
11. During his later years Seyyid Turki suffered much from ill-health,
and his sufferings impairing his mind and judgment rendered him prone to
superstition, and the painful suspicions arising therefrom embittered his last
days.
2.—'OMAN PIRATE COAST.
12. Shaikh Hameyd bin Abdullah, El Jowasimi, continues to rule over this
Ras-ei-Khaimah petty independent township, the most northern of
t the six so-called " Trucial ports." The people of
Ras-el-Khaimah were during the year on bad terms with the tribes of El-Haboos
and El-Shehooh, and several persons belonging to Ras-el-Khaimah were mur-
dered by their enemies in the outlying date plantations. The Hahoos also de
stroyed about two hundred date trees at Khat, a village under Shaikh Hameyd.
13. A vessel belonging to Ras-el-Khaimah having been seized illegally by
the Deputy Governor of Bunder Abbas, representations were made to Persian
authorities by the Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , which led to the payment of compensation by
the Deputy Governor.
Umm-ei-Kawain. ^ on ly occurrence to be noticed is the
avidnii v. ai t > death of Mohammed, son of Shaikh Ahmed -bin-
Abdullah, Al-Bu-Ali, Cbief of this district.

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Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. (no 265, Foreign Department serial no 25) for the year 1888-89, published by Authority and printed by the Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta [Kolkata]. A copy of a letter from Colonel Edward Charles Ross, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul-General for Fars, to Henry Mortimer Durand, Secretary to the Government of India (Foreign Department), dated 21 June 1889, is included in the report (folio 48), the original of which submitted the report to Government, under the following headings:

Part 1 ( General Summary ), submitted by Ross and dated 21 June 1889 (folios 49-57), containing numbered summaries of local political affairs, and incidents or events of particular note for: 1) Oman and Muscat state; 2) Oman pirate coast, including Ras-el-Khaimah [Ra’s al-Khaymah], Umm-el-Kawain [Umm al-Qaywayn], ’Ajman, Shargah, Debaye [Dubai], and Abu-Dhabbi [Abu Dhabi]; 3) El-Bahrain; 4) El-Katr [Qatar]; 5) Nejd and El-Hasa [Al-Hasa]; 6) Fars and the Persian Coast; 7) Persian Arabistan; and 8) Persian Baluchistan. Summaries of official appointments, naval movements, slave trade activity and climatic observations taken at the observatory at Bushire conclude the report. Appendix A is entitled ‘Notes on the “Ibn Rasheed” family of Jebel Shammer, and present position of Mohammed “Ibn Rasheed”’, with a genealogical table of the Rasheed dynasty. Appendix B is a translation of the Shah of Persia’s proclamation of 1888. Appendix C is a copy of the regulations for the navigation of the river Karun. Appendix D contains tabulated meteorological data for the year, supplied by the Bushire observatory.

Part 2 ( Annual Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. and Consulate for the Year 1888-89 ), submitted by Lieutenant Wallace Stratton, Her Britannic Majesty’s Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul at Muscat, containing a summary of affairs at Muscat (folios 58-59), under the headings: political affairs, official changes, and slave trade.

Part 3 ( Report on the Trade of South Persia and Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1888 ), submitted by Ross (folios 60-69). The report comprises a short summary of the year’s trade, with notes on: produce, including grain, opium, tobacco, gum and wool; steamers and freights; imports, including cotton goods, copper, loaf sugar, and petroleum; banking agencies; the opening of the river Karun to navigation; and the pearl fisheries. Appendix A comprises tabulated data on import, exports and revenue, in the Gulf ports and towns of Bushire, Shiraz, Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], Bunder Abbass [Bandar-e ʻAbbās], Bahrain and the Arab coast. An index to the trade tables can be found at folio 61v.

Part 4 ( Muscat trade report for the year 1888-89 ), submitted by Stratton and dated 17 May 1889 (folios 70-75), comprising a brief summary of the year’s trade at Muscat, and also containing tabulated data on imports and exports at Muscat (listed by commodity), and the nationality and average tonnage of vessels visiting Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (29 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four numbered parts, with lettered appendices containing further reports and statistical data following each part. The General Summary is further organised into numbered sections, and further divided into paragraphs which are also numbered, from 1 to 102.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 48, and ends on the last folio, on number 75.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1888-89.’ [‎49v] (7/60), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/56, No 259, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626733.0x000008> [accessed 24 April 2024]

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