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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1899/1900’ [‎268v] (10/150)

The record is made up of 1 volume (60 folios). It was created in 1900. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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ADMINISTRATION REPORT ON THE PERSIAN GULF The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. POLITICAL
Public Health and Measures to prevent the Introduction of Plague and
Cholera into the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. . —The past season has not been altogether a
healthy one, as plague appeared at Bushire, and there were severe outbreaks
of cholera during the summer at Gwadur and Maskat, to both of which places
the disease appeared to have been brought from Karachi, where it appeared in
a severe form in May, June, and July. Subsequently cholera broke out at
Basrah, and reports were received of occasional cases in various parts of
Arabistan. It has disappeared entirely in this part of the Gulf, and no cases
occurred at Bushire itself, but it still lingers on the Oman Coast. Plague was
discovered at Bushire in the beginning of June, and there is reason to think
that there were several cases before that, as the death-rate was considerably
above normal during the lime that it is supposed to have been present.
It will be seen from the statement given in the margin that for tlie month
In June 1899 there were . . . 53 deaths. ^ Jtme the ICpOrtcd deaths, fl'Om all
37 „ causes, were 53, that in July they had
40 ;; fallen to 37, and in August to 31. In the
41 „ three succeeding months there was a slight
36 ;; r i 8e > probably due to change of season,
July
August;
September
October
November
December
January
February
fell again, and the avei
20
18
and fever in consequence; but in Janu
ary and February, the number of deaths
rage death-rate for Bushire appears to be about 34 per
mensem, or 408 per annum, which, as the population of Bushire is supposed to
be about 20,000 souls, gives an annual death-rate of 21 per mille. These
figuies are only approximate and not reliable, no census having ever been
taken, and all deaths certainly not being reported. The information we now
have will, however, probably be useful in future, should any abnormal rise in
the death-rate indicate the presence of plague or other disease. The summer
heat put an end to the plague, of which no suspected cases have been heard of
^ rm e of July, and Bushire was formally declared free of plague on
the 2/th August last. r 0
There was a good deal of sickness in Bushire amongst Europeans towards
the close of the hot weather, and several cases of fever of a malignant type
occurred. There were, however, no deaths amongst adults except in the case
o i r. Campbell, Manager of the Imperial Bank of Persia, who succumbed to
an attack of fever on the 12th September. Mr. Campbell's early death was a
great loss to the small European community of Bushire.
Plague ttiots at 7iW«re.—AVhen the Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. Surgeon discovered early
in June that plague had appeared in Bushire, he recommended that measures
should be taken with the object of stopping its spread, and, if possible, stamp-
Rfin ^r I M S^n ^r er : bad alread y ^ed a footing, 'captafn
• ' vo Assistant burgeons were deputed from India to assist
m the preparation of a scheme and in its execution, if approved, by the Persian
Government The knowledge of these measures, while in contemplation"
and at re" nd er o a f T ? P0S ' ti0D ai '? 0n f ^ Muham ™dan population of the place.
TM p n nl i i i m ^^ or S aQlzed demonstration was got up to oppose them.
The people closed their shops, and assembled dailv in the mosques, while thev
were harangued bv the MoPas Snmo 411 wuiie tney
inprnW* nf H.o-R v i oi - as - &ome ill-teelmg was shewn against such
forward?n° n Ln« 7 '' lS Wer f su PP ose(1 to be taking an active part in
dem(mstra^ion hp?nir ,| iUleSl . ai ! at length this feeling took the form of a
lads led hv -i fpw «• n V ' 6 Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. itself, by a party of boys and
to nlao-nJ mp ^ ^own unruly characters, who had fomented the opposition
mc b weL dZrA la H th n h0pe o£ obtaining plunder for themselves. The
various wavs PW Governor, who subsequently punished the leaders in
th ou4ouf n h3! f 1V p mea9Ur L eS 1;ee P iB S P'ague out of Bushire have been
utri to h»ve^l/ ffi Pt : l , m E - W f kham Ho™, I.M.S., who has done his
Venice Convention" 1 A d^inLToT with'a'y^f^f 1106 With ^ the
ohtainpd from i ^ tecto f» wltl1 a disinfecting apparatus, has been
and though it arH ^ ei ' e 1 ] as b een considerable delay in its erection,
delay is partly dne^o th cod of September, it is not yet working. This
ful at first ifiteo f 6 ex P resse ^ the Governor, who seemed doubt-
on the Quarantine iT ^ W ? u to ^i^her disturbances. The structure
quaiantine island, where the machine will be worked, is now nearly

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Content

Administration Report on the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muskat [Muscat] Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for 1899-1900, published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of the Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1, is a General Summary (folios 268-71) written by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm John Meade:

  • Section 1: entitled General , includes: a report on the year’s rainfall and harvest; the Governorship of Bushire; public peace and tranquillity in and around Bushire; public health and measures to restrict cholera and the plague in the Gulf; Persian currency; customs house arrangements in Bushire; compensation claims; and the Resident’s tours through the region during the year;
  • 2: Oman – Muscat: including: a change in personnel, with the role of Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. being taken over by Captain Percy Zachariah Cox from Major Christopher George Forbes Fagan; the Sultan of Muscat’s finances; French proposals to construct a coal depot in Muscat; use of the French flag by Muscat vessels; association of the French flag with the arms and slave trades; the impact of cholera and plague in the region;
  • 3. Oman – Pirate coast, including: a list of the those shaikhs in the region who have met with the Resident in the past year; Arab-Persian relations over Lingah [Bandar-e Lengeh], and the expulsion of Persians from that port; the discovery of a large pearl at Kumzār and its subsequent sale for a lower-than-expected price; the prevalence of smallpox on the Arab coast;
  • 4. Bahrain, including: the wounding of two British-Indian subjects; difficulties discharging cargoes in Bahrain; and the death of Aga Muhummad Rahim, the Native News Agent in Bahrain;
  • 5. El-Nejd, with no report due to the recommendation that no one be deputed to travel there;
  • 6. Koweit [Kuwait]: no particulars reported;
  • 7. Persian Arabistan: the navigation of the Kārūn river, and opening up of river and land routes for trade;
  • 8. Fars and Persian coast: Bandar-e Lengeh in Persian hands; the arrival of the British Vice-Consul for Bunder Abbas [Bandar-e ʻAbbās];
  • 9. Persian Baluchistan: delays in compensation claims against the murder of Mowladad Khan; a change in the Directorship of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Telegraphs Department; rumours of a revolt against the Shah in Persian Baluchistan;
  • 10. Slave Trade: numbers of slave captured and manumitted during the year;
  • 11. Piracy: cases of piracy reported during the year, with details of where and against whom they were committed;
  • 12. Navy: details of the movements of British naval vessels (Sphinx, Lapwing and Pigeon) and significant foreign vessels, including Russian warship Gilyak;
  • 13. Official Changes: changes in British personnel;
  • 14. Changes among foreign representatives, with particular reference to German, French and Dutch representatives.

An appendix to part 1 (folios 272-75) includes statistical tables comprising meteorological data for the region; dispensaries in Bushire and data for the numbers of patients, diseases, surgical operations and income and expenditure of the Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. dispensary.

Part 2 (folios 276-78) is a separate report from the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , written by Cox, with reports on events in Muscat, Rostak [Rustāq], Sohar, Soor [Sur], and Dhofar [Z̧ufār], including: accidental shootings by Wahabee [ Wahhābī A follower of the Islamic reform movement known as Wahhabism; also used to refer to the people and territories ruled by the Al-Saud family. ] tribesmen; the appearance in Muscat of cholera and the plague; British and foreign naval movements in Muscat; and a statistical overview of manumission applications heard at the agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. .

Appendix A to Part 2 (folios 278v-85) is a detailed report with statistical data on the cholera epidemic in Muscat and Oman, written by the Lieutenant-Colonel Atmaram Sadashiv Jayakar, Chief Surgeon at Muscat. Jayakar’s report contains historical data on outbreaks of cholera in Muscat, symptoms of the disease, mortality statistics, treatment and its results, preventative and sanitation measures. Civil hospital and dispensary statistics follow on folios 285v-287v.

Part 3 (folios 288) is a trade report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for 1899, written by Meade. Its appendices (folios 289-328) comprise tables showing the value of all goods imported and exported to and from various parts of the Gulf region, and the numbers of vessels (with figures on tonnage) of various nationalities plying their trade in the region in each port.

Part 4 (folios 329-30) is a separate trade report with statistical data for Muscat for 1899-1900.

Part 5 (folios 331-35) is a trade report for Mohammerah [Khorramshahr] and the Kārūn river for the year 1899.

Extent and format
1 volume (60 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (f. 267) which lists the report’s contents in alphabetically ascending order, and refers to the report’s own pagination sequence.

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English in Latin script
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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1899/1900’ [‎268v] (10/150), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/77, No 379, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626792.0x00000c> [accessed 14 April 2024]

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