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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎25r] (47/411)

The record is made up of 1 file (203 folios). It was created in 28 Jul 1915-30 Jul 1918. It was written in English, French, Arabic and Persian. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

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2G

Tlie Gbazanfar-ns-Sultaneh showed due hospitality to us. It is necessary
for us to bring to the notice of the Government authorities what we have
learnt of the " philosophy " of this dispute. It is our conviction from the
outward and inward signs of the fighting that Haidar Khan and Ismail Khan
have no other object than the furtherance of the objects of the foreigners in the
South. And if Ghazanfar-us-Sultaneh and Agha Khan fall in with them in
their policy of worshiping foreigners, they will not spare their assistance.
Further, Ghazanfar-us-Sultaneh, Agha Khan and other Khans of Dashti
and Dashtistan are most willingly ready to afford them (Ismail Khan and his
friends) any assistance.
This is the history of our visit and the result of our trouble and our
impartial investigation. Of course the Government authorities are alive to
their duties and aware of the facts of this plan.
Yerily this is the true story.
(Sd.) The body of the Ulema of Kazerun—
Muhammad Ash-Sharif, Muhammad Abdur-
Rahim, Hasan Tabatabai (Habl-ul-Matin and
German Emissary No. 35 T?), Ala-ud-Din
Husaini Saedi, Ali Askar Abul-Hasan Husaini,
Mehdi Husaini, All Muhammad, Mehdi,
Muayyed-uz-Zakir and Habibullah Husaini.

Enclosure No. 5.
Telegram.
Extract from the " Tazianeh", No. 25, dated the 9th Eamzan 1333;
(22nd July 1915J.
To
His Royal Highness Ain-ud-Daijleh , Tehran.
Your esteemed telegram addressed to the Khans, Zair Khidhar Khan and
Shaikh Hussain Khan of Chahkutaii has been received and caused great
astonishment and regret; because now that God Almighty has granted us an
opportunity to restore the honour and former losses of Persia, the authorities
holding the reins of Government have sat still with folded handsnot only
have they not taken any action to improve the state of affairs, but they are
deceiving the' nation with phrases such as " th& necessary steps" and are
secretely aidrUg the enemies of our country.
Every patriot will interpret such telegrams only as partiality towards the
enemies of religion and our home, and against the feelings of the nation.
Such a meaning for the word " neutrality" has not been found in any
dictionary.
For several years past the north and south of our country have been
occupied by the troops of our enemies and they have taken all kinds of steps
in this crisis to crush our independence.
Do we consider ourselves still independent, and able to give orders for
neutrality or intervention ?
The wise of the nation have understood very well that if the Government
authorities were able or willing to preserve their honour, they would have
shown signs of this during the last 12 or 13 months, especially when our
guests were robbed.
It has been clearly visible that the traitors and followers of the enemies
of this country have always been the object o£ kindness; but a communitv
which has united in order to maintain the honour of their Government and
nation have been misrepresented as (disturbers of peace) and their action as
an historical disgrace.
We inform you plainly that the duty of the nation is first to obey the
religious leaders, and we also, in accordance with the decrees of the Proofs of
Islam and the leadership of our leaders, have prepared ourselves for Jeha#

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Content

This file contains correspondence between the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain and the British Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushire, as well as Sheikh ‘Isā bin ‘Alī Āl Khalifah, ruler of Bahrain, and Sheikh Qāsim bin Mahzā’, Qāḍī of Bahrain.

The correspondence concerns the anti-British revolt of the Tangsiri and Qashqai tribes, headed by Ra’īs ‘Alī Dalvārī under the influence of Wilhelm Wassmuss, and the aftermath of their attack on the British Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Bushire on 12 July 1915. Included within the correspondence are: letters concerning the occupation of the town of Bushire, British counter-raids and the death of Ra’īs ‘Alī Delvārī; the imposition of a blockade on Tangsiri boats operating in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; statements and customs papers (Acquit de Sortie and Permis de Cabotage) from various Bahraini and Persian nākhudā s (dhow boat captains) gathered by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ; the arrest and detention of Yūsuf Fakhrū on suspicion of political dealings with Germany; attacks against British diplomatic missions and residents in Persia, including Shiraz and Isfahan; and information concerning German activities in Persia during the First World War.

Extent and format
1 file (203 folios)
Arrangement

This file is arranged approximately in chronological order.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: Foliation is written in pencil, in the top right corner of each folio. It begins with the first item of correspondence, on number 2, and runs through to 201, ending on the inside of the back cover of the volume.

Written in
English, French, Arabic and Persian in Latin and Arabic script
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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎25r] (47/411), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/50, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023813429.0x00002f> [accessed 19 August 2017]

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