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'Vol-B.44. Confidential 86/7-vii. P.C.L. TRUCIAL COAST' [‎110r] (224/404)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (198 folios). It was created in 26 May 1937-9 Aug 1937. It was written in English, Arabic and Persian. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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RANiAN OIL COMPANY, LIMITED.
LONDON ani> ABADAN
I'KI I i.KAI’HIC Al'IiKl b'
ANGLIRAN."
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NO.
BUSH IRE RESlDENCY/j
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CONFIDENT!' 1 - RECORDS
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ABADAN,
SOUTH IRAN.
DATED 11th July 1937-
©
Dear Sir Trenchard Fowle,
I should have written before this to thank you for the
trouble you took with Gordon when I sent him down last month to
consult with you regarding future sand supplies from Kuwait.
We shall be following up this matter shortly when Gordon visits
Kuwait to come to an arrangement on the spot with de Gorey and
the Sheikh.
Gordon mentioned to me that you were rather concerned
about the movements of Haji Williamson in the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. States.
So far as we are concerned, Haji Williamson’s usefulness is now
at an end. You will be aware that our concessional interests on
the southern side of the Gulf have now been transferred to Petroleum
Concessions Ltd., so that our business in that part of the world
is now confined to the distribution and sale of products, mostly
in connection with refuelling commercial and military aircraft.
For this v/ork we do not require Haji Williamson’s services any
longer, and we therefore offered to transfer him to Petroleum
Concessions Ltd. if they could find any further use for him. We
have now had a reply from Wratislaw at Bahrein who states that
his London Office has agreed to his engaging Williamson on terms
identical to those which he has been epjoying from us.
Before taking any further action in the matter, hov/ever,
i should like your confirmation that you have no objection to this
transfer* If you would prefer us to do so I can easily arrange to
terminate his service with this Company and make no further
reference to a transfer elsewhere.
Yours sincerely,
^ Col. Sir Trenchard Fowle, K.C.I.E., C.B.E.
Bus hi r e.

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Content

The volume primarily consists of correspondence between the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Trenchard Craven Fowle, Percy Gordon Loch); Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain (Tom Hickinbotham); the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. Agent at Sharjah (Khan Sahib Abd ‘al-Razzaq) the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. (John Charles Walton, Maurice Clauson) and Petroleum Concessions Limited (Frank Holmes, Basil Henry Lermitte, Stephen Hemsley Longrigg, Frederick Lewisohn); the main subject of discussion is the negotiations between the Shaikh Sultan bin Saqar [Sulṭān bin Saqr Āl Qasimī], Ruler of Sharjah and Major Frank Holmes, negotiator for Petroleum Concessions Limited.

The correspondence discusses the negotiations for a commercial concession in Sharjah, which are concluded in the beginning of July 1937 with the Shaikh agreeing to sign the concession; and his subsequent concern over the Political Agreement and Exchange of Notes relating to the concession agreement.

Also discussed in connection with concession agreements is a letter drafted by the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. which contained an ultimatum to be used should any Shaikh appear to be holding out in negotiations with Petroleum Concessions Limited (PCL) with the intention of opening negotiations instead with the Standard Oil Company of California. The ultimatum stated that should the Shaikh in question not wish to give his concession to PCL, he would not be permitted to negotiate with or grant a concession to, any other company. The ultimatum was issued to the Shaikh’s of Sharjah, Ras al Khaimah and Umm al Qaiwain.

Further correspondence relates to PCL’s interest in exploring the territory west of the Oman mountain range and the subsequent discussion regarding which rulers claimed responsibility over the territory, whether they had actual authority there or whether it was in the hands of local shaikhs, and how PCL should approach exploring there in those circumstances.

The correspondence includes a detailed assessment by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain, Tom Hickinbotham, of the areas in question and outlines what he knows of the areas of the tribes that claimed ownership including the Beni Kitab [Beni Qitab] (also given as Beni Chittab); Naim [Āl Na‘īm], Bu Shamis [Āl Bū Shāmis] and Duroor [Al-Durur] as well as outlining where he believed the Shaikh of Abu Dhabi and Sultan of Muscat’s areas of authority to be. The correspondence concludes by recommending that the Company be persuaded to delay their explorations into this territory until the following year in order to permit the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. Agent to spend the winter visiting and exploring these areas in order to ascertain a more accurate knowledge of the situation.

Other matters discussed in the volume include:

Correspondence with the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. Shaikhs is in English and Arabic; letters from the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company contain Persian and English letterheads.

A series of file notes which were maintained as a record of the correspondence in the volume can be found at folios 191-196.

Extent and format
1 volume (198 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a table of contents on folio 4 consisting of subject headings and page references. The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the front to the rear of the file.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The main foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the front cover, and terminates at the inside back cover; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. An additional foliation sequence is also present in parallel between ff 5-190; these numbers are also written in pencil, but are not circled, and are located in the same position as the main sequence. A previous foliation sequence, which is also circled, has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English, Arabic and Persian in Latin and Arabic script
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'Vol-B.44. Confidential 86/7-vii. P.C.L. TRUCIAL COAST' [‎110r] (224/404), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/677, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100025313702.0x000019> [accessed 16 November 2019]

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