Skip to item: of 206
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'File 8/16 Bahrain Intelligence Summary' [‎71r] (141/206)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 file (100 folios). It was created in 1 Jan 1948-31 Dec 1948. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

-3-
Rso600/- per mensem. Both Cle j rks and labourers are now
paid in gold by ARAMCO and the sale of this gold boosts
salaries still higher. There is no shortage of clerks in
Bahrain, however, as the Government Schools are still turning
out yearly a sufficient number of young men with some pre
tensions to literacy to supply both the Bahrain Government
and the oil companies„
2 °7o PAKISTAN CURRENCY .
The Karachi newspaper "DAWN” reported in its issue
of Sepoember 4th that "despite the overwhelming demand for
Pakistan Currency” the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. had issued a notice
that all the transactions should be in Indian Currency and
not Pakistan Currency. The paper calls this "one more proof
of Britrin’s anti-Pakistan policy".
The Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. has issued no orders regarding
the currency to be used in Bahrain. At the request and on
behalf of the Pakistan Government, however, he sent the Bahrain
Government and Bahrain banks a copy of a note prepared by the
Pakistan Ministry of Finance in which it was alleged that
malicious propaganda had been carried on in some countries
in the Middle East with a view to sabotaging and discrediting
Pakistan Currency. The Bahrain Government replied that it
did not consider that there had been any propaganda in Bahrain
directed towards the discrediting of Pakistan Currency. This
was also the opinion of both the Bahrain banks. They added
that Pakistan currency was being freely accepted by the banks,
a charge of one anna for every ten rupees being made to cover
the cost of its repatriation to Pakistan. A similar charge,
they stated, was being made in purchases of Sterling Notes,
Iraq Dinar Notes, and Egyptian PoundsNotes to cover the cost
of repatriation to their respective countries.
208. PERSIAN CLi.IM TO B AHRAIN.
Reference paragraph 196 of Intelligence Summary
No.14.
The Persians seem to be carrying on particularly
intensive propaganda regarding their claim to Bahrain.
A report was current recently in Manamah that a Persian Deputy
had offered a large reward and grants of land in Persia to
anyone (including, of course, Persians in Bahrain) who could
bring forward proofs of the validity of the Persian claim to
Bahrain. The origin of this report was said to be a Baghdad
broadcast. A few days later an Arabic broadcast from Paris
stated that the Shah had settled satisfactorily to Persia her
claim to Bahrain with His Majesty's Government and that the
islands were to be handed over to Persia.
209. LIQUOR .
(i) Ghulam Akhtarzadah was once a servant of the
Adviser to the Bahrain Government and is now the proprietor
of a large new shop and restaurant called the Moon Stores.
He recently imported a consignment of apple cider and established
himself for a time as the most popular restaurateur in the'
island. Bahrainis, who partake impartially of Scotch, local
arak, ahd Eau de Cologne in secret, flocked to drink cider in
public. The alcoholic content of the cider was negligible
but such is the power of faith that many who drank it displayed
all

About this item

Content

The file contains fortnightly intelligence summaries produced by the Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. at Bahrain for the year 1948. The reports, marked as secret, were sent to the Government of India, the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , and numerous diplomatic, political, and military offices in the Middle East. Each report is numbered from 1 to 24 and covers a two week period.

The reports are divided into short sections that relate to a particular subject. Contained within the file is intelligence on the following:

  • shipping;
  • visits of British and foreign notables;
  • economic and commercial matters, including the pearling industry;
  • local news and affairs, as well as that of Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iran, Oman, and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. ;
  • the work of third parties in the region, such as the Bahrain Petroleum Company, Gray, Mackenzie and Co., and Petroleum Concessions Limited;
  • labour matters, especially strikes and unrest;
  • local reaction to international events such as the end of the British Mandate in Palestine and the death of Mohandas Gandhi;
  • the activities of the Royal Navy;
  • the supply of electricity, water and telecommunications;
  • aviation;
  • the work of the Middle East Anti-Locust Unit;
  • the traffic of slaves;
  • quarantine and medical matters;
  • weather and meteorological data.

The final page of the final report appears to be missing.

Extent and format
1 file (100 folios)
Arrangement

The file is arranged chronologically.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at the front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 103; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. A previous foliation sequence, which is also circled, has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'File 8/16 Bahrain Intelligence Summary' [‎71r] (141/206), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/319, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100025550055.0x00008e> [accessed 25 April 2019]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100025550055.0x00008e">'File 8/16 Bahrain Intelligence Summary' [&lrm;71r] (141/206)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100025550055.0x00008e">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000241.0x00014e/IOR_R_15_2_319_0141.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000241.0x00014e/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image