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'Report on the Administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1877-78.' [‎243v] (32/165)

The record is made up of 1 volume (81 folios). It was created in 1878. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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12 ADMINISTRATION REPORT OE THE PERSIAN GULF The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. POLITICAL RESIDENCY An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India.
flows, undoc the name of the Mand or Mund, or Kakee River, into
the Khor Ziaret, in Uashti, may now be confidently asserted. It has,
as laid down, on the Haji’s map, a course of at least 300 miles, and no
doubt, if followed up from mouth to source, the distance would be
found much greater. The source of this considerable river is near
Kodiyan, north-west of Shiraz. My personal acquaintance with it
consists in having, in common with all travellers of the Bushire-Sluraz
road, crossed it at Khan-i-Zinyan; and again I crossed it at Kewar,
where it is known as the Kewar River. 1 also explored the creek ot
Khor Ziaret, where it debouches for twelve miles. Of other European
travellers, the same river was crossed by M. Rivadeneyra in 1S75 at
Taduan, and previously by Keith Abbott, still further south, in the Kir
District. Thence its career has been matter of conjecture, and it is
only by the Haji’s map that the gap is filled. The accompanying
sketch of the river and its affluents is from that source.
In 1874-75 Senor Rivadeneyra, a Spanish officer, with the rank
of Consul in Persia, made an extensive tour in Persia. Starting from
Teheran, he traversed Western Persia, through Luristan and Khuzistan
to Mohammerah; he then proceeded through Rushire to Shiraz, and
thence to Firozabad, Darab, Kerman, and Yezd. This gentleman is
now preparing an account of his observations for publication in Spanish
at Madrid.
Lieutenant-Colonel Macgrcgor, about the same time, made a
private tour in the east of Persia and collected further information
for his valuable Gazetteer. The same year Mr. Mackenzie of the firm
of Messrs. Gray, Paul & Co., explored the Ispahan-Shuster route, and
wrote an useful account of it. Another enterprising English officer,
Mr. Ernest Floyer, of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Telegraph Department, started
from Jask, and penetrated through the unexplored region of Bashakird
to Kerman, whence he proceeded to Ispahan and Baghdad. I his
gentleman is also preparing an account of his travels and surveys.
Some four years ago a gentleman of German nationality, Dr.
F. C. Andreas, under the patronage of the Prussian Government and
the Royal Academy of Sciences of Berlin, undertook to conduct an
Arshmologic-Epigraphic exploration in Persia, and has been since at
work in the province of Fars. The main original object of this expe
dition is understood to have been the search for, and copying of,
inscriptions in the ancient Pahlavi characters, but the researches of
Dr. Andreas and his associate Dr. Stolze have extended to a wide range
of subjects, and they are understood to have amassed a great deal of
interesting information connected with the archaeology, geography,
philology, zoology, ethnography, history, and statistics of Fars. The
discoveries of these savants will be illustrated by a series of typical
photographic portraits of specimens of each tribe, which it is thought
will prove a valuable contribution to scientific ethnography. A vast
number of ancient bricks with cuneiform inscriptions were excavated
by Dr. Andreas from a mound near Bushire, but the Persian (Govern
ment have refused permission for the removal ol the collection from
Persia. I may mention that I recently presented a few bricks, found

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Administration report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for 1877-78, published by Authority at the Foreign Department Press, Calcutta [Kolkata], 1878. The report is based on reports sent by the Officiating Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. (Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Charles Ross) and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat (Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Barrett Miles) to the Government of India. The report is preceded by a copy of a letter sent by Ross to Alfred Comyn Lyall, Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department, dated 8 July 1878, which enclosed the submission of the original reports.

The report is organised in a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part I: General Report, signed by Ross, and arranged under subheadings as follows: Oman; Arab Coast; Bahrein [Bahrain]; Nejd [Najd]; Province of Fars and the Persian Coast and Islands; Bushire; Coast from Bushire to Lingah [Bandar Lengeh]; Lingah; Bunder Abbass [Bandar Abbas]; Persian-Baloochistan [Baluchistan] Coast; Bassidore [Bāsaʻīdū]; Establishments; Slave-Trade; Appendices (including meteorological tables, notes on the Kara Aghach River by Dr Friedrich Carl Andreas*, the route from Bushire to Lar and Shiraz, and the route from Lar to Shiraz, the Persian Post Office and Foreign Postage, and tables of Persian money and measurements).

Part II: Report on trade of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the year 1877, signed by Ross and arranged under subheadings, as follows: Effects of late war on the trade; Steam communication; Grain harvest; Scarcity of coin; Opium; Pearl fisheries; Impediments to development of trade in Persia; and appendices (including notes on the pearling industry by Captain Edward Law Durand, notes on date palm cultivation by James Charles Edwards, and 31 tables of trade statistics covering imports/exports from/to the various ports and settlements of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , and between the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and India).

Part III: Administration report of the Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , Muscat, for the year 1877-78, prepared by Miles and arranged under the following subheadings: Political; Official changes; Slave Traffic.

Part IV: Trade statistics for Muscat, prepared by Miles, and comprising of six tables covering imports, exports, and number and tonnage of vessels entering and leaving the port.

* Folio 246 - a map has been temporarily removed and replaced with a green sheet of paper noting its removal.

Extent and format
1 volume (81 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into four parts (I-IV).

Physical characteristics

Pagination: The report has a pagination system which uses numbers printed in the top-left corner of versos and top-right corner of rectos.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Report on the Administration of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for the year 1877-78.' [‎243v] (32/165), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/32, No 152, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100026446897.0x000021> [accessed 14 April 2024]

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