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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1891-92’ [‎157v] (20/55)

The record is made up of 1 volume (27 folios). It was created in 1892. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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20
ADMINISTRATION REPORT ON THE PERSIAN GULF The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. POLITICAL
on hand at the close of the year, and could not be disposed of profitably at
market rates.
Sugar .—The market in loaf sugar was overstocked at the beginning of the
year, as the result of the large imports of 1890 and shipments were in conse
quence restricted. Rates improved in the summer, and after a temporary fall
recovered again at the close of the year, when they were fairly remunerative.
The bulk of this sugar, comes from Marseilles, and German loaf sugar now
finds no market here. In soft sugar the importations from Europe were
smaller than usual. The Mauritius supplies the greater portion, and it is
received, shipped through Bombay, in better condition than that from
London.
Tea .—A taste for Indian in preference to Java tea has sprung up, and
though Java tea, which replaced China varieties some time ago was still im
ported, there was a still greater demand from Calcutta.
Exports.
The wheat and barley crops in the south of Persia were excellent, although
owing to the rain ceasing early in the season, the grain was smaller than usual.
The export was large and continuous, and probably exceeded that of any pre
vious year. Shipments were made both to London and to Indian ports, where
remunerative prices were obtained in consequence of short crops in Europe
and the enhanced value of sterling, even in spite of the large quantities of
grain offered for sale. Eventually, however, rates fell, and the Jews, who were
then the chief exporters, lost considerably. The export of cereals has been
steadily increasing of late years, showing that the area of cultivation must be
also widening. The usual embargo was placed on the export of grain—shipment
only permitted on the payment of special fees. As remarked earlier in this
report, it is not improbable that this embargo may be enforced this year, both
because the crops are not good, and also because the administration of Ears
has passed into other hands and different views may prevail.
Cotton .—Persian cotton, owing to false packing, imperfect cleaning, etc.,
is not in high repute in the London and Liverpool markets, and the year's
transactions were hampered by low prices both in India and in Europe. The
crop itself may be profitable to the grower, but is not so to the exporter who
buys from him, considering the risk to which he is exposed of a constantly
fluctuating market. There are considerable stocks now on hand, and these will
have to be shipped in order to realise, even if there is but little improvement in
prices.
Opium .—The opium crop was unusually large, but owing to the persistent
fall of prices in China, speculators were heavy losers. The scale of shipment*
however, varied very little, being slightly larger to London where it is usually
sent by European firms for use in the preparation of morphia, and smaller to
China. The fall in prices has been as marked as it has been rapid. Only
two or three years ago shippers could obtain $500 a chest in China, and £11
a pound in London. Kow the prices obtainable are $350 and 7s. 6d. respec
tively; and as this article has been often exported to the extent of 7,000 chests,
it is obvious how many interests are affected by these fluctuations in value.
Wool .—This is generally exported by Persians, and is sent first to Bussorah
where there are facilities for cleaning, sorting, and pressing it,' it is not highly
thought of, and the trade in it is said not to be profitable. Most of the wool
goes to London, and a fair amount was shipped, but prices did not encourage
exporters.

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Content

Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. for 1891-92, published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1 , is a General Summary (folios 150-153) written by Adelbert Cecil Talbot, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and divided up as follows:

1. Oman-Muscat Coast, general summary of political, trade and military developments along the coast over the previous year.

2. Oman Pirate Coast, gives summary of relations between the various ruling families on the coast including political, trade and military matters.

3. Bahrain, summary of events in Bahrain during the previous year; records an influenza outbreak and an excellent date crop. Matters related to the pearl trade are also discussed briefly.

4. El Hasa, reports the arrival of the new Ottoman Mutasarif (Governor) Said Pasha An Ottoman title used after the names of certain provincial governors, high-ranking officials and military commanders. and notes that diarrhoea and influenza were rife during the previous year, resulting in many deaths.

5. El Katif [Al Qatif], notes that piracy has been rife and a general feeling of insecurity has prevailed during the previous year. Also notes introduction of new land laws by Turkish [Ottoman] authorities and that small-pox was prevalent at El Katif.

6. Nejd, reports that the Al Saood [Al Saud] family appear to have finally lost control of the Nejd region to the Al Rashid dynasty of Jabal Shammar.

7. El Katr, reports that Jasim bin Thani continues to disobey the Turkish [Ottoman] authorities and gives an account of recent tribal fighting in the area.

8. Persian Arabistan, general summary of political, trade and military developments in the region over the previous year. Notes that Talbot visited Ahwaz accompanied by Captain Kemball in January.

9. Fars and Persian Coast, general summary of political, trade and military developments along the coast over the previous year. Mentions prevalence of influenza and small-pox on the island of Kishm and the appearance of large numbers of locusts in Kirman.

10. Persian Baluchistan, summary of political developments in the region. Also notes destructive presence of locusts around Charbar and Geah in July 1891.

11. Slave Trade, summary of the status of slave traffic in the region.

12. Royal Navy Vessels, records arrival and subsequent departure from the Gulf of H.M.S Redbreast and the replacement of Commander Hart-Dyke of the H.M.S Sphinx as Senior Naval Officer, Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. with Commander Streeton of the H.M.S Brisk .

13. Political Appointments, reports that there were no changes in Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. officials and that in September 1891, Surgeon-Major Ross was succeeded by Surgeon-Captain Duke as Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. Surgeon.

14. Observatory, points to Appendix A containing the results of daily weather observations in a tabular statement.

Part 1 also contains the following appendix (folios 154-155): Appendix A, Table showing Force and Prevailing Directions of Winds and recorded Rainfall at Bushire for the year 1891-92.

Part 2, is an Administration Report of the Muscat Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. and Consulate for the year 1891-92 (folio 156) written by Atmarim Sadashiv Jayakar, In Charge Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , Muscat. The report provides a summary of political and military developments in Muscat throughout the past year.

Part 3, is a Report on the Trade of Southern Persia and the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the year 1891 (folios 157-158r) written by Adelbert Cecil Talbot, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. . The report contains details regarding the types and quantities of imports and exports in the region. Appendix A to Part 3 (folios 158v-165) contains 25 tabular charts related to all aspects of trade in the region.

Part 4, is a Muscat Trade Report written by Atmarim Sadashiv Jayakar, In Charge Political Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , Muscat (folios 166-171). The report contains a number of detailed tables related to trade to/from Muscat.

Part 5, is a Report on the Trade of Mohammerah for the Year 1891 (folios 172-174). The report contains a description of the state of trade in Mohammerah and several tabular charts regarding imports and exports to/from Mohammerah and the surrounding region.

Extent and format
1 volume (27 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (folio 149) which list the report's contents.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1891-92’ [‎157v] (20/55), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/61, No 293, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100026447392.0x000015> [accessed 24 April 2024]

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