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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎31v] (67/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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49
*
ships in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was considered by the Government of India a suffi.
cient advantage to compensate for the loss in other directions. At the s.me
? me by the redaction in the size of the vessels and by he substitution ot
natives for Europeans in respect of stoker ratings, a notable economy * as
effected in the wastage of European life and healu m Indian paters. In 1905
the Admiralty made a fresh proposal: it was to the effect that the duties
carried on in Indian waters by ships of His Majesty s Navy should be made
to devolve on ships of the Royal Indian Marine, and that the three subsidised
gunboats then in the Gulf should be handed over to the Government of India
for incorporation in the Royal Indian Marine. The scheme however did not
commend itself to Lord Curzon’s Government; they foresaw certain ad
vantages in the shape of more immediate control by themselves over a portion
of the°naval force in Indian waters, in the formation of a body of officers
possessing special local qualifications, and in an enhancement of the status of
the Royal Indian Marine; but they held that these would be outweighed by
lo«s of prestige in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. where the regular war-vessels of other
European nations were now frequently seen, by decreased naval efficiency, by a
serious sacrifice of economy, by imperfect co-operation between the Royal
Navy and the Royal Indian Marine, by the difficulty of arranging reliefs and
consequent prejudice to the health of crews, and by cessation of direct interest
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. on the part of the British naval authorities; they therefore
adhered to the opinion which they had expressed in 1902, that the true remedy
for the difficulties of the situation Was to arm particular ships of the Royal
Indian Marine, when necessary, as auxiliaries to, but not as substitutes for,
ships of the Royal Navy. The scheme of the Admiralty was not in the end
adopted, and the arrangements introduced in 1901 accordingly continued to
be in force.
An effective rejoinder to Russian displays of naval force was made on two
occasions, at the instance of the Government of India, by the despatch of
British vessels of superior strength to the
British naval demonstrations. Gulf. The cruise of the Russian “ Varyag”
in December 1901 was answered by a visit in Juno 1902 of H.M.S.
“ Amphitrite,” a first class cruiser of 11,000 tons, to Maskat, Sur, Sib, Barka,
Bunder Abbas, Henjam, Bushire and Koweit ; the sight of this powerful ship
everywhere made a strong impression, especially at Maskat where an exhibition
of heavy gun practice was given outside the harbour. The immediate reply to
the cruise of the Russian “ Askold ” in December 1902 was the despatch to
the Gulf in the following month of His Majesty’s first-class battleship
“ Renown ”, which had brought His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught
to India for the Delhi Coronation Darbar; the “Renown” visited Maskat,
Bushire, Lingah, Bunder Abbas and Jask, and was by far the largest and most
imposing vessel which had ever been seen in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
But the principal demonstration of British force in the Persian waters was
Lord Curzon’s own Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. tour of 1903, which constituted a display of
_ . ^ , . strength and magnificence that no foreign
nation could hope to rival in such a part
of the world: it was undertaken primarily for the purpose of inspecting the
Indian establishments and of visiting the Arab Chiefs in treaty relations with
the British Government, hut also as a visible sign of the paramount political
and commercial ascendancy of Great Britain.
The^ R.I.M.S. “ Hardinge ”, carrying the Viceroy, left Karachi on the
16th of November 1903, accompanied by the second class cruiser” Hyacinth
the flagship of Rear-Admiral Atkinson-Willes—, by the first class cruiser “ Argo
naut,” and by the third class cruisers “ Eox ” and “ Pomone,”—all ships of the
Royal Navy. Maskat was reached on the 18th of November ; the town was en
fete, the welcome of the Sultan was cordial in an extreme degree, and evidences
of popular rejoicing abounded on every side. On the first day of the visit a
deputation of the highest rank was sent by the Sultan to welcome Lord Curzon,
the Sultan himself was received on board ship by the Viceroy, and interview's were
accorded to the French and American Vice-Consuls ; Lord Curzon then landed
and visited the British Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , where he was entertained at lunch and replied to

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎31v] (67/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000044> [accessed 25 August 2019]

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