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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎61r] (126/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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CHAPTER II.
Financial position: loans.
The ever-increasing financial difficulties of the Persian Government rendered
necessary, recourse to foreign loans and thereby the extension of foreign influ
ence was* greatly facilitated. It is necessary, therefore, to give a short retrospect
of the history of such loans and the measures adopted by Lord Curzon’s Gov
ernment to ensure that British interests were protected.
2. In 1892, popular opposition to the Tobacco Regulation led the Persian
Government to cancel the Persian Tobacco Concession belonging to a British
Company and Russia offered to lend them £500,000 for the payment of the
compensation which became due to the Company. Lord Salisbury then inter
vened and instructed Sir E. Lascelles, the British Minister at Tehran, to inform
the Amin-es-Sultan that any act by which the Shah handed over to a Foreign
Government his control over the customs revenue of the southern ports of Persia,
would be an alienation of his sovereign rights to which Her Majesty’s Govern
ment would be justified in objecting, and against the validity of which a formal
protest would be made.
3. The same warning was conveyed by His Lordship in 1897, when it
was rumoured that the Persian Government were negotiating a loan with Messrs.
Oppenheim’s branch bank at the Hague, and the Hon’ble Mr. C. Hardinge, the
Charge d’Affaires at Tehran, was instructed to represent to the Shah that it
would be a grave error of policy to pledge to foreign financiers the customs
revenues of the Southern Persian ports. An assurance was requested from
the Persian Government that under no circumstances whatever would the
control of the customs of Southern Persia be ceded to a foreign Power. The
Mushir-ed-Dowleh on October 23rd, 1897, replied by giving the following
assurance :—
“ You have written that there was a rumour that the customs of Southern Persia (a)
would be placed uuder foreign supervision and control as guarantee for a loan, I therefore take
this occasion of informing the Legation that this rumour is without foundation, and that they
will never be placed under foreign supervision and control. ”
4. On 19th March 1899, Sir M. Durand reported to Lord Salisbury that the
Persian Government tvere considering a project for a French loan with Russian
support, and that the security to he given was the general customs revenue of
the country with the right of appointing controllers in case of default. There
upon Lord Salisbury directed the British Minister to repeat to the Sadr-i-Azam
the warning which had already been given formally on more than one occasion,
that any arrangement which would tend to place the control of the customs of
the southern ports of Persia in the hands of a foreign Power would bo resisted by
Her Majesty’s Government. Up to this point the phrase employed in convey
ing our prohibition had been either “ customs of the southern ports of Persia ”
or “ customs of Southern Persia, ” and language of the same wide meaning was
used both by Sir M. Durand and the Government of the Shah in the communi
cations which ensued ; but on 7th April 1899, Lord Salisbury introduced a new
expression when he telegraphed to Sir M. Durand that the 1 ersian Minister in
London had been told that the prosperity of Persia was a matter of great interest
to Her Majesty’s Government who much regretted their inability to offer more
effective help in the matter of the loan, but that the political interests of Her
Majesty’s Government had to he studied and such interests were incompatible
with the exercise of control or jurisdiction by a European Power over Persian
Gulf ports. His Lordship also renewed the above intimation often previously
given to the Persian Government and informed the Persian Minister of
His Lordship’s willingness to communicate the same to any lenders who may he
disposed to rely for their security on the proceeds of these ports.
5. Lord Salisbury’s message was communicated by the British Minister to
the Sadr-i-Azam, and although nothing passed at the time to suggest that
(a) Or more literally, that some or certain South Tersian customs.

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎61r] (126/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x00007f> [accessed 22 August 2019]

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