Skip to item: of 386
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎136v] (277/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

14
no arrangements have been made, as far as we are aware, in respect of any
portion of the railway from Konia to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for securing the condition
whereby His Majesty’s Government contemplated that equality of treatment
should be secured for British capital.
4. During his recent tour in the Gulf the Viceroy personally visited the
Khor Abdulla, in company with the Naval Commander-in-Chief on the East
Indies Station, and the result of the inspection was to confirm the view which
we previously entertained of the importance of the Khor and of the superiority
of its shores, for the purpose of a railway terminus, over any of the sites in the
immediate neighbourhood of Koweit which have previously claimed attention.
On board the “ Lawrence”, Their Excellencies passed up the channel to the*
anchorage below the junction of Khor Zobeir with Khor Um Kasr, and
except at the eastern end of Warba Island, where there is a bar with a depth
of two fathoms for a short distance, a depth of four and-a-half fathoms was
obtained throughout. The anchorage is some three miles from Um Kasr post,
and the banks of the channel are sufficiently high to provide a firm and
convenient landing place. To the south of the Warba Island lies the laro-e
sheet of water with plenty of depth and room for an anchorage, to which Rea 0 r-
Admiral Willes refers in paragraph 50 of his letter No. 20y—1171, dated 8th
December li 03, to the Secretary to the Admiralty, of which we enclose a copy.
Owing to the length of the channel and its capacity for easy land or
submarine defences, a port in either of these localities would be absolutely safe
from any attack from the seaward,
We have already intimated in our Secret despatch No. 16. dated the 21st
January 1001, that the remarks of the Naval Commander-in-Chief in paragraph
51 of this letter were written under a misapprehension, and do not accurately
represent the political position. It is not necessary here, therefore, to take
them into account.
5. In our Secret despatch No. 27 (Frontier), dated the 4th February 1904,
we have mentioned the probable antagonism of German interests to our own in
this quarter and the attitude which, in our opinion, should be adopted towards the
designs of other nations in Turkish Arabia, and we consider that no time should be
lost in endeavouring to retrieve so far as may still be possible the position which
we have so seriously endangered by acquiescence in these encroachments. So
far as concerns Um Kasr and the neighbouring mainland, the claims of
the Sheikh of Koweit do not appear to have been strong. But whatever
may have been their validity, it would be difficult, and we would not now
propose to try, to induce the Turks to abandon the occupation which for the
past year they have been permitted to maintain. The case of Bubivan Island we
regard as entirely different. Here we consider that the Sheikh has claims which
can be sustained alike with better reason, with greater prospect of success, and
owing to its insular position, with smaller risk of subsequent embarrassment
to ourselves. In February 1°02, our
No. 42, dated the 28th February 1902. Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the' Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
„ i . reported* that Sheikh Mubarak had
addressed to him a written communication in which he advanced bis claim to
the island and asserted that the Avazem tribe, who are his subjects, bad lived
there since the occupation of Koweit for seven months during the summer of
each year, and had estabbsned fishing enclosures on the island. Colonel
Kem »a l regarded the pretention as valid, and a like view appears to have been
held by His Britannic Majesty s Ambassador at Constantinople, who a few days.
Lana * hi ter telegraphed f to the Marquess of
nnnoirWn/t m *11 ’ i • x xr Lansdowne that the Consul at Basrah
considered ILeSheiihs claim to tLe island to be good. Sir Nicolas O’Conor,
aokl i ^ i ^ , d.°S 0 t”he r n«‘ of L ‘“- however -, <? x P^«4the opinion that there
■RnKivan TcionU n-i i • n m was no object m raising a conflict about
AmbSiirloWhe l U ° • e!mnS , le Turks in Possession of Um Kasr. Had the
w^beW tW 1? 'I P 08s , es . slonof tho information which is now available,
the mainlnn! 4 i f n° l i not ' l y e entertained this view. With the shores of
ancWoTlw tt k %an l sla “i in tl,e Possession of a single Power, the
1 ° vasi an( a f W arba Island can at any time be converted

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎136v] (277/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x00004e> [accessed 21 August 2019]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x00004e">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;136v] (277/386)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x00004e">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x000066/Mss Eur F111_534_0277.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000001491.0x000066/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image