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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎161r] (326/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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63
only a Power, possessing a recognised and effective supremacy, could claim to
net. When in 1871, the Sultan (Saiyid Turki) was unable to cope with
a rebellious cousin, and British subjects suffered from the consequent distur*
bances, the British fleet took active measures against the rebel force, shelled
them out of their fort at Mesnaah, and exacted an indemnity from them for
compensation of British subjects. In 1877, when the El-Sharkiyeh tribe
attacked Maskat and Muttra, and the Sultan was unable to protect himself,
H.M.S. “Teazer” went to his assistance, defended the town of Maskat from
the sea, and caused the rebels to retire. The Dutch Treaty with Maskat is
itself an evidence of British supremacy ; for the Dutch Consul at Bushire, in
1877, requested the British Resident’s co-operation in negotiating it ; the
Captain of the Netherlands corrette “ Batavia,’* who was in charge of the
treaty, left it in the Resident’s hands, and Colonel Prideaux sent it to the
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Maskat to negotiate with the Sultan. On Muttra and
Maskat being attacked again by rebellious tribes in 1883, and on the Sultan
appealing to the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , H.M.S. “ Philomel*’ shelled their camps
at both places, and prevented them from advancing into the towns. In Feb*
ruary 188G our Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was directed to tell Sultan
Saiyid Turki, in view of the repeated attacks which had been made upon him
and of his loyal compliance with the advice tendered to him by the British
representive, that the British Government would uphold him against unpro
voked aggression.
3. When Sultan Saiyid Turki died in 1888, it did not seem by any means
certain that Saiyid Faisal, the present Sultan, would he able to make good his
claim to the throne. There is no recognized law of succession in Maskat.
Saiyid Faisal was not the eldest son of his father and there was a formidable
rival in the field in the person of his uncle, Saiyid Abdul Aziz. For a time
the British Government withheld its formal recognition of a sovereign as to
whose qualifications serious doubts were entertained ; but from the date of
his formal assumption of power, the subsidy of Rs. 86,400 a year, which had
been paid to his father, was continued to him, and it is no exaggeration to^ say
that by these means alone was he enabled to consolidate his position. When
lie was finally recognised in 1800, he intimated his intention to maintain to the
full the same relations as had existed with the British Government in the time
of his father, and to act up to all the engagements undertaken by his
father and predecessors in the Government of Maskat. He then pledged, him
self in a formal assurance to the following effect : “ It is my earnest, desire to
he guided in all important matters of policy by the advice of the British Gov
ernment, and to so conduct the government as to secure the continued fiicnd-
ship and approbation of the Viceroy and the British Government. Relying
upon this assurance, the British Government have ever since deterred kaiyid
Abdul Aziz, who subsequently retired to India, from attempting to revive
dynastic trouble in Oman. In 1891-95 when there was a rebellion in Maskat
against the authority of Sultan Saiyid Faisal, the Government of India warned
Sheikh Abdullah-bin-Saleh to cease from attacking the Sultan, and they autho
rised Bis Highness in November 1895 to issue a notification warning the lead
ing Sheikhs of Oman that, whatever differences they might have in future with
the Sultan, the Government of India would not allow them to attack the tow ns
of Maskat and Muttra. Further, the Government of India gave to the Sultan
their countenance and support when the people of Dhofar rebelled against him,
and they enabled him to put an end to that uprising.
4. This catalogue of services rendered by the British Government to
successive rulers of Maskat and notably to the present occupant of the throne,
the annual payment of a subsidy contingent upon the loyal fulfilment of treaty
obligations, and the history of the influence thereby exercised by Great
Britain for a period of nearly half a century upon the fortunes ol the State,
at once explain and justify the existence of a positive political, predominance
on the part of Great Britain, that is shared by no other Power m the affairs ot
Maskat. While not compromising the independence of its sovereign, w ucli
both the British and French Governments have reciprocally bound themselves,
by an undertaking in the year 1862, to respect, this condition of allairs las }e

About this item

Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

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English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎161r] (326/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118030.0x00007f> [accessed 19 August 2019]

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