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'File 73/7 IV (D 25) Anglo-Turkish Negotiations' [‎34v] (78/103)

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The record is made up of 1 file (42 folios). It was created in 3 Aug 1913-30 Nov 1913. It was written in English, French and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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4
identity of our interests and on the enjoyment of their efficacious support in case of
need against the activities and intrigues on the part of the Turkish agent which he
instinctively apprehended, and which he feared would prove no less a worry to
ourselves than to him. I was not specially authorised to give him the purport of
the Secretary of State's telegram in writing; but I do not think I should have got his
assurance in writing without it, and my refusal to give it would have aroused undesirable
suspicion of our good faith in his mind.
11. We separated a few minutes later, and he subsequently sent me the letter
of acceptance of which I attach a translation. The first portion is based on lines
suggested to him by myself; the remainder, from the words " I would only represent"
onwards, is not meant by him to detract from his acceptance, but merely reminds us
of the three questions of succession, customs, and admission of European foreigners to
Koweit in connection with which he either forsees difficulty and claims our support, or
feels that the situation needs clearing by the light of the convention.
With the first two matters I have dealt sufficiently in the foregoing paragraphs.
As regards the third—his future attitude towards foreigners—Sheikh Mubarak
incidentally referred to the question of the overtures made to him in the past by
Messrs. Wonckhaus and Co., and enquired whether his obligation to admit a Turkish
agent involved any obligation or permission to admit other foreigners. 1 replied that
our advice to him to keep Messrs. Wonckhaus and others at a safe distance had
reference partly to the indefinite nature of his status vis-a-vis the Turks, a fact which
was likely to afford such persons opportunity for intrigue. I continued that ray
personal view was that the regulation and establishment of his status by the present
convention somewhat altered the position, but I explained that the terms of the
convention only provided for and referred to the admission of a Turkish agent, and
did not affect his existing understanding with us as regards others; so that I
considered that it was still obligatory for him to consult us before admitting other
foreigners. I concluded, however, that I would, if he desired, make a fresh reference
to Government with regard to the case of Messrs. Wonckhaus and ascertain their
views. Sheikh Mubarak agreed that that was the best course to pursue, and 1 trust
that 1 shall receive instructions on the point.
12. Though there is no doubt that, by the achievement of the convention with
Turkey, Sheikh Mubarak's position—provided that he has our staunch support in
repelling the slightest encroachment by the Turks on the terms of it—is greatly \
improved, yet there can equally be no doubt that, in virtue of our engagements with
Koweit, more especially articles 5, 9, 10, and 1'Z of the Shweikh Agreement, we bear
a very serious and lively responsibility towards the Sheikh ; and 1 therefore venture
very respectfull}' to draw pointed attention to those articles now, and to express the
earnest hope that we shall demonstrate to the Sheikh and to the Porte, from the
moment the convention comes into operation, our fixed intention to protect Sheikh
Mubarak's interests to the utmost.
13. Before concluding this somewhat lengthy report I should like to avail myself
of the opportunity, now that those portions of the convention affecting the Sheikhs of
Koweit and Moharamerah are practically completed, of recording my acknowledgments
for the loyal co-operation which I have received throughout from Captain Shakespear
and Major Haworth, the political officers accredited to those potentates, at my recent
interviews and in the spade work done on the spot in connection with the details.
I have the more reason to appreciate this in that, owing to the absence of direct
telegraphic communication with either port, and the fact that many of Government's
references needed speedy telegraphic reply, 1 have been unable always to consult them
before replying as freely as I should wish to have done; but Government will, I am
sure, appreciate the fact that the amenable demeanour of the Sheikhs is due in no
inconsiderable measure to the happy relations existing between them and the two
political officers attached to them.
I also wish at the same time to commend to Government the excellent work done
and valuable assistance rendered to me by Captain A. T. Wilson, in connection with
the Mohammerah frontier question.
14. I am sending copies of this communication to His Majesty's Minister and to
the Political Secretary, India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , for information.
I have, &c.
P. Z. COX, Lieutenant-Colonel, British Resident in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and His Majesty's Consul-
General for Fars, cfec.

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Content

The file contains letters, telegrams, memorandums, and maps relating to Anglo-Turkish negotiations over the Baghdad Railway, the status of Kuwait, and other Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. matters. The correspondence is between Percy Cox, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushire, William Shakespear, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Kuwait, the Government of India, the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. in London, Louis Mallet, Under-secretary of State for Near and Middle Eastern Affairs, Arthur Trevor, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain, Shaikh Abdalla bin Jasim bin Thani [[Jāsim bin Muḥammad Āl Thānī], Chief of Katar [Qatar], the Government of India, Sheikh Khazal [Khaz‘al al-Ka‘bi], ruler of Mohammerah, Sheikh Mubarak al-Sabah, ruler of Kuwait, and the Foreign Office, in London.

The file contains drafts and counter-drafts of an agreement to be eventually signed by the British and the Ottoman Turks. Included is correspondence relating to Percy Cox's attempts to obtain Sheikh Khaz‘al's and Sheikh Mubarak's agreement to the draft agreement, and to concern over the status of Qatar, including the presence of the Turkish Garrison there.

Folio 27 is a list of the sons of Sheikh Jasim, the late ruler of Qatar.

Extent and format
1 file (42 folios)
Arrangement

The file is arranged chronologically.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The file is foliated from the front cover to the inside back cover, using circled pencil numbers in the top-right corner of recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. pages. There is an earlier foliation system that runs through the file, using pencil numbers in the top-right corner of recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. pages, as well as the top-left corner of any verso The back of a paper sheet or leaf. pages bearing written or printed matter.The following anomalies occur: 1a, 11a.The following folios are foldouts: 19, 20, 26, 38, 42a.

Written in
English, French and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'File 73/7 IV (D 25) Anglo-Turkish Negotiations' [‎34v] (78/103), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/614, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023281214.0x00004f> [accessed 20 March 2019]

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