Skip to item: of 50
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

‘File 5/201 Manumission of slaves and rules relating to cases arising out of the pearling industry’ [‎9r] (24/50)

The record is made up of 1 volume (21 folios). It was created in 28 Oct 1918-1 Nov 1918. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

%
%
only entitled to our assistance in the case o£ interference with his liberty The
impression which appears to exist in some ports that a British manumitted
slave becomes a British subject ipso may be in the slave's interests
and need not be actively dispelled, but it will not hold water if challenged.
There is no objection, however, to giving a deserving individual holding a
C< ; rtl ^ ate .>, friendly offices as a special case and to the
extent to which the local authorities will accept them.
(vi) Subsistence allowance at the rate of not more than four annas a day
he granted to slaves whose cases are under consideration, at the discretion
0 i fj i ? ^r®* The cost of food and of repatriation when necessary
should be drawn on a separate bill and attached to the monthly cash account
sent to the Comptroller, India Treasuries, Calcutta.
(vii) In cases of persons born in slavery (known as " Muwallid" or
domestic slaves) good offices can only be given in circumstances of gross
ill-treatment with a view to the extraction of a guarantee from their masters
that the ill-treatment shall cease. They are in no case entitled to a
Manumission Certificate; on the other hand we are under no obligation to
assist their masters to recover them. It should be remembered in this connec
tion that domestic slavery is not prohibited in Turkey under the Brussels Act.
A domestic slave is one born in slavery, one or both of the parents being: at the
time bonded slaves.
(viii) Emancipated slaves, who can work as field labourers, porters, &c.,
but not those of the domestic class, may be sent to Zanzibar in direct com
munication with His Majesty's Agent and Oonsul-General at that place ; in
such cases all charges, which should of course be kept as low as possible and
should not exceed Us. 50, in each case, will be borne by Government.
The funds required may be drawn on separate bills and submitted with the
monthly account to the audit officer concerned.
if necessary, be sent by native craft, sailing
Zanzibar, His Majesty's Agent at that place
their despatch; if, however, native sailing
craft are not available, emancipated
slaves may be sent to Zanzibar via
Bombay by steamer, the cost, which
dated should not exceed about Rs. 50, being
debited as described above [note (vi)].
The above procedure can be applied to all ports under the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
Hesidency.
(ix) Whilst a slave from Persia or from the Arabian shore of the Gulf,
not otherwise entitled to his freedom, becomes ipso facto free on setting foot
in British India, it has been held that if he returns of his own free will to the
Foreign Department letter No. 164i7 E.-A., dated plaCC wheiC he Was formClly domiciled,
the 6th September 1892. he reverts to his original status of slavery.
(x) It was held in 1896 by the Advocate-General to the Government of
Bombay in the case of the seizure of a slave dhow on the high seas by Captain
F. G. Beville, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Maskat, that the capture was probably illegal
because section 3 of the Slave Trade Act of 1873 only authorises seizure by the
Commander or Officer of any of His Majesty's ships.
(xi) Refund of expenditure. —When a slave is restored to his owner,
either because he is not entitled to manumission or as the result of a reconci
liation effected between him and his master, the expenses of returning him
(including cost of his feed and keep) should be notified direct to the Consular
Officer concerned with a view to its recovery from the owner. In the case
of refugees from the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. the cost is treated as a first charge on the
man's earnings and will be recovered and refunded direct by the E/esidency
Agent in due course.
Emancipated slaves may,
under the British flag to
being advised by post of
Foreign Department letter No. 145 E.-A., dated
the 16th January 1900.
Foreign Department letter No. 2142 E.-A., dated
the 30th October 1900-
Foreign Department letter No. 918 E.-A
the 8th May 1903.
T

About this item

Content

The volume comprises two printed documents. The first is guidelines for the manumission of slaves, printed by the British Government’s Foreign Office Press, and issued to the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushire. Part one of the guidelines is for the Persian shore of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . It outlines the authorities (treaties) for manumission, grounds for manumission, and the procedures for manumission. The second part of the guidelines deals with the Arabian shore of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Bahrain, Muscat and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. are dealt with separately.

The second printed document in the file is a set of guidelines for dealing with the various scenarios in which economic disputes might arise between captains, divers and merchants in the pearling industry in the Gulf. The guidelines are for use by British agents and representatives in Bahrain, Kuwait, Bandar-e Lengeh and the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. . The emphasis in the rules is on the honouring of debts as a means to ensuring the financial stability of the pearling industry, and sets out the obligations of divers to their captains, duties of captains to their divers, captains to other captains regarding loans, and captains to their debtors.

Extent and format
1 volume (21 folios)
Arrangement

Two separate printed reports with their own pagination systems, bound together into one file. No chronology.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The volume is foliated in the top-right corner of each recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. . The two printed reports that comprise the volume each have their own internal pagination systems.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

‘File 5/201 Manumission of slaves and rules relating to cases arising out of the pearling industry’ [‎9r] (24/50), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/234, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023399489.0x000019> [accessed 11 December 2019]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023399489.0x000019">‘File 5/201 Manumission of slaves and rules relating to cases arising out of the pearling industry’ [&lrm;9r] (24/50)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023399489.0x000019">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0000cf/IOR_R_15_1_234_0024.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0000cf/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image