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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎15] (158/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Spain, returned to the East and was received at Goa by the Portuguese
authorities and forwarded on his way to Persia with every honour; but
the results of his mission must have been disappointing to the Shah, for
that monarch caused him to be put to death immediately on his arrival.
A bishop from Spain had accompanied Danish Baig to the East to
propagate Christianity in Persia; but, having apparently foreseen
unfortunate consequences from the failure of the Persian embassy, he wisely
remained at Hormuz. Some time after this, Shah 'Abbas, who appar
ently hankered after a special arrangement with some European nation
in regard to the silk trade, suggested that a Spanish gentleman of note
should be sent to negotiate with him instead of ecclesiastics, as hitherto,
"for he should know better how to treat with such a one, and God and
" His Majesty would be better served, because a religious man out of his
Cf cell was like a fish out of water and in response to his invitation a
certain Don Garcia de Silva Figueroa was despatched from Madrid with
costly presents and a magnificent retinue. This Ambassador, however,
on account of the hostiliues which Shah 'Abbas continued to commit
against the Portuguese in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and particularly of his expul
sion of the Portuguese from Bandar 'Abbas in 1615, did not, so far as
can be ascertained, proceed beyond Goa until the following year.
During' the earlier part of the reign of Shah 'Abbas prior to 1600, Holations
of Persia and
a considerable part of Persia was in possession of the Turks, who held Turkey.
Tiflis, Tabriz and even Nihavand to the east of Kirmanshah. After 1600
however, the Shah addiessed himself with much success to the recovery
of the lost provinces : in 1602 he took Nihavand ; in 1603 he dislodged
the Turks from Tabriz, which they had occupied for 18 years ; in 1605
he invested Erivan and Baghdad ; and finally in the same year, having
purposely withdrawn his troops from the siege of Baghdad, he completely
defeated the Ottoman forces in the field at a great battle, in which Sir
Robert Sherley, fight ng on the Persian side, received three wounds.
Isfahan was at this time the capital of Persia, and the Shah had a garri
son at Rishehr in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
Establishment of tae first English Factories in Persia, 1616-17.
The arrival of the Farman obtained by Steel and Crouther provoked
an immediate discussion as to whether, and if so in what manner, the com
mercial privileges conceded by the Shah should be turned to account by
the East India Company.
Before the receipt of the Farman, but after the question of opening Cautious
a trade with Persia had been mooted, Sir Thomas Rco had enjoined P 0 0 *

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎15] (158/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009f> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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