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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎14] (157/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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14
and Span- were now decidedly upon the wane. In 1604, when Peixeiva voyaged up
lards, 1000 ^ Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the Portuguese were in bad odour along the whole
Persian coast on account of the raids committed by their vessels, and
their merchant ships could not obtain supplies there ; Nakhilu and Ri<>
were places particularly hostile to them. They still, however, retained
some of their authority ; and native boats running from Rishehr to Eig
sometimes took Portuguese passes. In 1612 and 1615 their fleets were
defeated by the English in encounters off Surat, and their inferiority at
sea began to be suspected by the Mughal government. In the Persian
Gulf, likewise, their naval credit began to decline. About 1602 they
were dislodged from Bahrain by the Shah of Persia ; and about 1608 their
settlement on Hormuz was blockaded by the Shah's forces and was
reduced to considerable straits.
In 1613 the Khan of Lar tried to recover Bandar* 'Abbae, which
the Portuguese had apparently seized and fortified in the previous year
as a precaution against a blockade of Hormuz from the mainland. A
force proceeded to attack the Laris, but the ship carrying the Portuguese
commander took fire and blew up; his successor in the command,
however, continued the operations and in the end defeated the enemy.
Ultimately the Shah apologised to the "Viceroy of Portuguese India for
the action of the Khan of Lar, which he asserted to have been unautho-
rised. The Portuguese retained Bandar 'Abbas only until 1615, when
they were expelled by the Persians after a siege of some duration.
In March 1616 the Portuguese, helped by a neighbouring tribe,
attacked and took Sohar on the Batinah Coast of'Oman. Their object
was to destroy a port which competed with Masqat and Hormuz and
injuriously affected the Portuguese revenue from customs. Muhammad,
the ruler of Sohar, was killed in ac-tion ; aud his brother, having been
taken prisoner, was put to death. The Portuguese further violated the
tei rns of the capitulation by falling on the garrison as tley evacuated
the place.
^ hile fighting proceeded between the Persians and th« Portuguese in
the Gulf, embassies continued to be interchanged betweei the courts of
Isfahan and Madrid. In 1613 Danish Baig, a Persian ambassador to
• Bandar Abbas takes its name from Shab 'Abbas I, by whom it vas founded about
tlnu time, probably as a check upon Hormuz. To Knropeans. in th? 17th and 18th
centuries, it was generally known as " Gombroon," " Gammeron." "Comoran," etc.;
this name, according to Hamilton (see his New Account of the East Indies, 1,92),
ret applied tu it in derision by the Portuguese, being taken from a word in their
» n o aa g e meaning a shrimp. A different conjecture connecti it with Gumiuk, thf
Persian word for " cuetoros."

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎14] (157/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009e> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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