Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎219] (362/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

219
1
H, ii
li,
(tv
fafiisi
May 18£9 to 30tli April 1830 was Rs. 78,524; and at Busbehr at this
® made soy;,, period, as i a Turkish ; Iraq, the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. guard was commanded by a
British officer, and there was a Civil Surgeon. From 1823 to 1834, it
should be observed, the office of British Envoy at Tehran was filled by
nominees of the Government of India, not of the British Government.—at
first Sir J. Macdonald Kinneir and then Sir J. Campbell ; and, perhaps in
l ' 1 ' connection with this change, a scheme was propounded by the Court of
1 11 sa:Directors in 1834 for diminishing the political expenditure in the Persian
Qg ilufjj I Gulf by reducing the status of their officer at Bushehr from that of Resi-
'aiised, Ife- ( l en t that of Assistant to the British Envoy at Tehran ; but the Assistant
W at was " lves t e( l with considerable discretion (besides power to refer,
in an emergency, to the Government of Bombay) in matters concerning
the Arab powers of the Gulf. The Bombay Government, however,
protested strongly against this anomalous arrangement, which they
considered must lead to the nomination of officers of insufficient
experience to the difficult position of British representative at Bushehr,—
a position that was likely to become even more difficult if, as had been
proposed by the Governor-General of India, the duty of watching over
the maritime peace should hereafter be transferred from the Indian to
the Royal Navy; they foresaw no advantage from the Arab tribes
being brought under the surveillance, even indirect, of the British Envoy
at Tehian ; and they were unwilling to incur the divided responsibility
which might be forced upon them by a reference from the officer at
Bushehr upon the occurrence of a crisis in Gulf affairs. In deference
to their objections, evidently, the project was abandoned.
The idea of establishing a British station on an island in the Gulf,
j : despite che unfortunate experiences of the British detachment on
Qishm, was not yet dead. In 1827, doubtless in consequence of the
disturbaices which had recently occurred at Bushehr, Major Wilson, the
Resident, was ordered to visit and report on several places in the Gulf to
which tie Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. might in case of need be transferred. He recom
mended Kharag, and L.3 recommendation was supported by the Governor
of Bomlay, Sir J. Malcolm, who had for nearly twenty years strongly
advocated the British occupation of Kharag. A Civil Finance Com-
a' mittee, appointed in 1830 to enquire into the finances of British India,
f. Ci however, condemned the Kharag plan as likely to entail an increase,
j- rather than to facilitate a reduction, of expenditure; and their view
was justified by an estimate framed by the Acting Resident in 1831,
which stowed that, while a saving of half a lakh of rupees a year in civil
ui

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎219] (362/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a3> [accessed 22 February 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a3">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;219] (362/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a3">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0362.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image