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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎338] (481/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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338
measures at Persian ports had been committed by the Persian Govern
ment to British management, together with the short duration of a single
small epidemic of plague that occurred at Bushehr, defeated the real
purpose of these Russian deputations; and a threat made by the Russian
Legation at Tehran in 1899, that Cossacks would be sent to Buehehr as
they had been to Sistan to form a plague cordon, remained merely a
threat. When attempts were made in 1903 and 1904 to encroach upon
the powers of the British sanitary executive, they appeared to proceed
from the Persian Government and the doctor of the French Vice-Consulate
at Bushehr, nor is there any proof that they were instigated by the
representatives of Russia at Tehran or elsewhere. Russia, however, still
continued to regard the sanitary organisation of the Grulf as a field in
which the predominant influence of England might advantageously be
challenged ; and in 1905 the Russian delegate on the Board of Health at
Constantinople unsuccessfully urged the creation of a sanitary station,
under the authority of the Board, near the Straits of Hormuz, a project
of the Paris Conference of 1903 which Great Britain had accepted subject
to conditions but was known to regard with disfavour.
Projected
Freuch naval
base in the
Gulf of
French activity in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 1899-1905.
W bile Russia was striving to create for herself a naval and commercial
position in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the French Republic, though its schemes
were of a less grandiose character, was somewhat similarly employed,
A local understanding between the two powers had early been detected
by His Britannic Majesty's Minister at Tehran, who on the 7th June 1899
placed the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushehr in possession, by telegram, of his
views on this subject. Co-operation bet ween Russia and France in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was recommended in an article which appeared in the St.
Petersburg "Novoe Vremya" of the 13th (26th) September 1901; ami
the amenities exchanged between French and Russian naval officers in the
Gulf itself pointed; on more than one occasion afterwards, to the existence
uf a common policy. The joint tour of the Russian cruiser " Boyarin
and the French cruiser <c Infernet" to Masqat, Bushehr, Kuwait and
Lingeh in 1903 was obviously intended as a display of united action.
At the same time it would be a mistake to suppose that France had no
separate ambitions of her own in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The facts on the con
trary indicated that she aimed at the establishment of a Freuch protectorate

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎338] (481/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000052> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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