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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎561] (704/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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owever '
:e(1011 ' ^ pii;
^ oittv
to Masai
tonally to al tte la
' liif orfe ^
Psted in writ^^;.
t elect,
«<1 a vist to tk St
general Dariar attci; •
n annouio
acewitltheFel,!-;:,
softheriglitsoffe
'ter 1899,
irive the F mc I i
r own control jlmtfe
jrdesijns.^foi
'ein ; (
rho owed Hsapj®' 11 '
l noftlleF^eIlciC^»5^-■
d that pnB«
:a ndin^ elS
jgubsequeDtij^
inch agents^
French m ](
i IE I''
the local representative of the Russian Steam Navigation and Trading
Company, and was joined in 1902 by two of his sons and by another
Frenchman; M. Goguyer had given trouble to his own Government
previously in Tunis and Abyssinia, but he had the powerful influence
of the French Colonial party behind him. A journalistic campaign
which he now inaugurated against British influence is described separately
elsewhere* In ]90l the chauvinistic M. Ottavi, who carried his anti-
British spleen so far as to be generally absent from Masqat, and so
to avoid dressing his flagstaff on Proclamation Day, was succeeded in the
French Vice-Consulate at Masqat by the more moderate M. Laronce.
The results of British action at Masqat were mortifying to the Settlement of
French Government, the more so on account of the publicity with which
they had been invested ; but they placed the question of the French tion qneation,
coaling station upon a clear basis and necessitated its being discussed
thereafter by the British and French Governments as a matter between
themselves. The French authorities, who evidently hoped to be able to
retain Bandar Jissah by means of suitable guarantees as to the natuie of the
French occupation, at first demurred to the view maintained by the British
Foreign Office, that the Declaration of 1862 precluded the acceptance by
either France or Britain of a cession or lease of 'Oman territory ; eventu
ally however they accepted the British reading of the tieaty. In aich
1899 an assurance was given to France that no obstacle would be laised to
her obtaining coal sheds in Masqat harbour on the same conditions as the
existing British sheds in the Makallah cove were held; this implied that
the national flag would not be flown, that defences would not be elected,
and that the basis of occupation would be sufferance merely, cornering no
territorial or sovereign rights. At the end of March Majoi Fagan, the
British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , suggested that the British and Fiench coal } ai
might both be accommodated in the M akallah cove; and the unwil ingness
of the French Government to adopt this simple and natuial solution o
the difficulty made it even plainer than before that what t.l ie y rea Y
desired was a separate pied-a-terre in 'Oman, not coaling facilities a a ^
where steam vessels under the French flag hardly e\ei calle . 11
1899 the French Government proposed Riyam, and in Jaimaij •
Kalhuh, bays outside the Masqat harbour, as the site of the coalyar
allotted them; but the British Government declined to agiee to >
and at length in May 1900 the British offer of a division of the Ma a a^
site was accepted. The ground, after being somewhat enlarge , was
divided into two portions with equal superficies and fionta 0 e,
French, having been invited to choose, took the southern half-
unitioPj
Vide page 339 ante.
45

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎561] (704/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000069> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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