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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎562] (705/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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562
Progress of
the French
flag question,
1899 -1902.
1899.
1900.
In the ultimatum of February 1899 the Sultan had been advised by
the British Government to order his subjects to use a distinctive flag and
to explain to his people that the grant to them, after such order, of flags
or protection by the representative of a foreign power would be invalid
and would amount to an infringement of the independence of 'Oman.
The Sultan, chiefly on sentimental grounds, was indisposed, and in the
end refused, to make any alteration in the nondescript red flag of 'Oman ;
but he wrote on the 16th of February 1899 to the French flag-holders at
Sur, enjoining them to give up their flags ; and on the following day he
informed the French Vice-Consul at Masqat that he did not recognise
the right of the French to exercise jurisdiction over 'Omani subjects in
'Oman, that he regarded the action of the French in this respect as
contrary to the Declaration of 1863, and that in future he would exercise
jurisdiction over his subjects himself. Nothing of importance resulted
from these steps; and the proceedings in the case during the next four
years, though continuous and not devoid of incident, were inconclusive.
In October 1899 the French Government, acting upon incorrect
information, complained that the British representative at Masqat had,
besides calling in question the validity of the French flag, demanded of
the Sultan that he should enforce the disuse of the French flag by his
subjects and promised him the assistance of a British man-of-war. At
the end of the year various expedients for neutralising the effects of the
French flag system were under the consideration of Her Majesty's Govern-
ment and the Government of India.
In May 1900 the Sultan signified his willingness to write a letter to
the British Government, requesting them to undertake his case in a
discussion with the Government of the Republic; but the offer was
not accepted. In June 1900 the Sultan, who at this time had
no suitable vessel of his own, paid a visit to Sur in H.M.S.
a Sphinx." Captain Cox, the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Masqat, was
also on boaid ; but neither he nor the British naval officers took any
cognisance of the Sultan's doings on shore. The result of the Sultan's
nsit, in so far as it concerned the French flag case, was that on the
12th June the French flag-holders of Sur spontaneously presented the
Sultan with a wiitten agreement in which, after solemnly professing
allegiance, they i enounced from that day the benefits of French protection
., Un ei ^ 00 ^ ie turn the French flags and certificates in their possession
f, e e ~, ! eS ^ 0 rp ()ltlini ty to the authorities from whom they had received
a • 18 ■P a ^ ei re ^ ef l to no less than 45 vessels, and the only 'Omani
vesse ying the French flag not included in it was one which did not
e ong o ui } three of the certificates produced had been issued
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About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎562] (705/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00006a> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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