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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎697] (840/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Q
697
10 years from the 1st of June 1843. In the eyes of even the Qasimi
I Shaikh the prospect of an undisturbed pearl fishery year by year outdid
in attractiveness the possibility of taking" naval revenge at intervals upon
his military rival the Shaikh of Abu Dhabi.
The idea underlying the Maritime Truces was, on the part of the Working
British authorities, the prevention of piracy, as distinct from its punish- of
ment under the Treaty of 1820; and the truces were regarded as a Efim* 1
Natural corollary to the suppression of crime at sea, inasmuch as they truces •
provided a guarantee for the free exercise of other maritime callings by
tribes formerly piratical. The result of the truces, within the limits
which bounded them, was beneficial in the highest degree. The danger,
at times apprehended, of hostilities at sea between a signatory and a
non-signatory power never took actual shape; and from ougaging as
allies in the naval wars of non-signatory powers, as one or more of them
might have done upon opposite sides,—this being a case not provided for
in their engagements,—the Trucial Shaikhs were firmly, and successfully
dissuaded by the local British authorities.
A point more than once debated in the early years of the trucial
system was the proper treatment thereunder of attacks by land parties
upon the crews of fishing boats drawn up in creeks or backwaters,
often at a distance from their own port. It was held by the
Resident, in whose view the Shaikhs eventually acquiesced, that such
attacks were a form of land warfare and as such were not prohibited by
the terms of the Maritime Truce.
Trivial cases of aggression, chiefly at the pearl banks, by boat upon
boat were still not infrequent; they were almost invariably due to the
absconding of indebted divers or other pearl operatives from the jurisdic
tion of one Shaikh to that of another, and they generally took the
form of an attempt to capture the debtor, or to recover the amount of his
debt, from the boat or the tribe to which he hud attached himself. The
settlement of such cases was felt to be a delicate matter, for enforcement of
extradition by the British authorities might involve a high degree of
interference on their part in local affairs and might destroy an important
safeguard against oppression of their subjects by the Shaikhs. Endeavours
were accordingly made to induce the Shaikhs to come to an understanding
on the subject, independently of any guarantee by the British Government
for its observance; but they failed, partly because of the reluctance of the
Arab to surrender in any circumstances the fugitive who has taken
refuge with him, and partly in consequence of an idea entertained by
each chief that his own government was the most attractive to strangers
and would be the chief loser by a check upon migration. For the
.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎697] (840/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575945.0x000029> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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