Skip to item: of 318
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

Enclosures of letter to Her Majesty's Secretary of State for India, No.11, dated 15 January 1875: Nos. 3 to 45 of Abstract of Contents, from the Officiating Under-Secretary to the Government of India, Fort William [‎92v] (84/100)

The record is made up of 50 folios. It was created in 15 Jan 1875. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

form close to the screeu near where Colonel Phayre used to sleep. T did not
open the packet, and therefore was unaware of the number of powders it-
contained.
A few days after this when Yeshwantrao and Salim came to the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India.
with the Maharaja, they began to enquire of llowjee how it was that nothing
had happened, and asked whether he had administered the powders or not.
llowjee then spoke to me and said he did not know how to account for there
being no result, as he had certainly put the poison in the " sherbut." The Maha
raja being dissatisfied about this sent for us again, and about fifteen days after
the great Dussara Sawaree we went as usual to Yeshwantrao's house. It was
about 8 o'clock at night when llowjee and I met there, and we accompanied
Yeshwantrao and Salim as before, and they brought the Maharaja and
introduced us in the same room. He immediately upbraided us for not having
carried out his wishes as promised, upon which llowjee declared that he had
put the powders in the " sherbut," but stated that he did not think they could
possibly have possessed the required property. The Maharaja then said very
well, that he would give something else which would be brought to me by
Salim. At this time and when we were about to leave, Yeshwantiao gave
something (I am not sure what it was, a small bottle or what it was) to Salim,
who passed it on to Rowjee. The former promises of high reward and favor
were repeated, and we came away. The following morning Salim brought me
a packet which I handed to Rowjee the same day on coming to the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. ,
lie was sitting as before on the form near the screen. A few davs after this
the conversation took place of the attempt to poison Colonel Phayre. Rowjee
told me that as instructed he on each occasion mixed the powder with water
which he shook up in a little bottle before pouring it into the sherbut. He
used to keep the bottle for this purpose hid under a large empty wooden
box close to the form above referred to. Rowjee used often to give me notes,
written sometimes by himself and sometimes by Jugga at his dictation, to send
on to the Maharaja. These notes contained all the information of what was
going on at the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , and Salini or his man used to call at my house for
them. I live in the city, and have always been in the habit of returning to my
house at night, and on Sundays I have not been inquired to come to the
Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. .
On the several occasion? when we visited the Maharaja, Jugga came once
with Rowjee from camp and on all other occasions he was accompanied by
Karbhie.
Taken this 26th day of December 1874 before
(Sd.) P. H. S outer,
Commissioner oj Police, Bombay.
Nursoo Jemadar was taken into custody on the 23rd December consequent
on the confession made by Rowjee, which so seriously implicated him as an
accessory in t ie attempt to poison Colonel Phayre. He was at once given in
charge oi the military guard at the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. . The following morning, at his
own expressed wish, he was brought to the Commissioner of Police, before
whom he made an unconditional confession. Previous however to hearing his
statement, it was distinctly explained that no promise of pardon could be held
out to him. Ihe Jemadar was then brought before Sir Lewis Pelly, who told
him before listening to his confession that he would not only not hold out hope
of pardon, but explained to him distinctly and positively that he would not be
pardoned. I pon this the Jemadar took off his turban and laid it at the feet
76
Exd.—J. T. F.

About this item

Content

The enclosures relate to the attempted poisoning of Colonel Robert Phayre, formerly Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Baroda, including the Colonels interviews with the staff at the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. on duty the day of the poisoning, and the implication that the Gaekwar of Baroda had ordered it. Also discussed are the subsequent enquiry into the affairs of the Gaekwar, both financial and personal, and concerns that such an enquiry and any subsequent trial could lead to civil disturbances in Baroda.

The enclosed correspondence is between the Secretary to Government at Bombay (Charles Gonne); Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department (Charles Umpherston Aitchison and Frederick Henvey - Officiating Under-Secretary); Agent, Governor-General for Rajputana [Rājasthān] and Special Commissioner at Baroda (Lewis Pelly); the Viceroy of India (Thomas George Baring, Second Baron Northbrook); the Advocate-General at Bombay (Andrew Scoble); and the Commissioner of Police at Bombay (Frank Henry Souter).

Extent and format
50 folios
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

Enclosures of letter to Her Majesty's Secretary of State for India, No.11, dated 15 January 1875: Nos. 3 to 45 of Abstract of Contents, from the Officiating Under-Secretary to the Government of India, Fort William [‎92v] (84/100), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F126/81, ff 52-100, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023626960.0x0000bb> [accessed 18 February 2020]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626960.0x0000bb">Enclosures of letter to Her Majesty's Secretary of State for India, No.11, dated 15 January 1875: Nos. 3 to 45 of Abstract of Contents, from the Officiating Under-Secretary to the Government of India, Fort William [&lrm;92v] (84/100)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023626960.0x0000bb">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000001524.0x000384/Mss Eur F126_81_0186.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000001524.0x000384/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image