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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎23v] (44/411)

The record is made up of 1 file (203 folios). It was created in 28 Jul 1915-30 Jul 1918. It was written in English, French, Arabic and Persian. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Enclosure No. 2.
Supplement to the "Jam-i-Jam", No. 18, dated the Uth Ramzan 1383 (-2 7th July 1915),
entitled "The situation in the South".
The present position or proofs of the weakness of the English.
Before we inform our compatriots of the present situation, we will tell
them briefly the relations of individuals among the people, and of the Chiefs
in the South with the English. So far as we can say with certainty, the
English considered themselves not only the Governor and Ruler in the South,
but the humble conduct and slave-like action of the Chiefs had given them
such confidence that they considered themselves without trouble the owner of
all the South.
In India where they had been labouring for 150 years, and where they
had used armed fcrce at the time of occupation, still when an Officer or Head
was going to visit the villages on inspection, in spite of the fact that there is
not a man with a rille in India, they considered it imperative for themselves
to start with a certain force, lest danger would befall them.
But in these parts it has been often seen that a single man, Mr. Chick,
the Vice-Consul, has started with a handbag and a single sowar from Bushire
entered all Dashti and Dashtistan, which are all armed and are the warlike
people of the South, even into the nomad tribes, and found that he was
respected and esteemed in every way. While, in order to show the valour
?ind prowess of his cunning Government,^ such villages like Dilwar were
being bombarded for the sake of a single unworthy and unimportant
Tangistani, and a trivial accusation, yet in the same way he was visiting
alone Borasjun, Chahkutah and even Behbehan.
Apparently no one had the ability to think over the matter. But at
present this state of things and the previous effects have undergone such
changes and the people, high and low, have taken up such a hostile attitude
that, without exaggeration, if they land four thousand men with numerous
puns to Bushire, they will not be able to take a step beyond the first tower of
Muqam, the extreme end of Bushire.
AVe have seen the reason of this. Ever since they tried to dishonour the
Persians, arrested and expelled the Germans in Bandar Rig and Bushire,
contrary to.the neutrality of Persia, and attacked the house of Eaji Ali of
Tamgak and there were rumours of unity among the chiefs of J)ashti and
Dashtistan with a view to reprisals, not a single officer has been able to leave
Bushire, in spite of the fact that they had landed one thousand men at Bushire
to defend themselves, and with the help of the traitor, Muwaqqar-ud-Douleh,
had placed many guns in such positions as were necessary and made strong
sangars.
They saw very well that the German Consul was sometimes at Ahram, 8
farsakjis from Bushire, and another time at Shamshiri, 6 farsakhs, and finally
15 days at Gurak, 4 farsakhs from Bushire, and was being kept by the
Tangistanis, vho were openly showing themselves as the enemies of the
English, particularly during his stay at Shamshiri and in the first days of his
stay at Gurak there were not more than 40-50 tufargchis, yet they were
unable to take a step from Bushire and take such illegal action* as they were
wont to do.
Agha Shaikh Ilussain Khan, Chahkutahi, who formerly was their great
and close friend, seeing that religion w r as concerned, at once declared himself
on hostile terms with them, and showed opposition to them and became the
founder of the combination in the South.
■The Ghazanfar-us-Sultaneh, who was always known for his moderation
joined hands with the confederates, although he showed weakness afterwards.
ItoweA er, as he has now perceived their weakness with his own eyes, he is
hotly bent upon revenge and the preservation of his honour.
At present, the persons among the Khans in Dashti, Dashtistan and the
Ports w ho shows himself in favour of the English is liaidar Khan, the traitor
and .Muwaqcjar-ud-Douleh, the offender, and none else. Although Ismail Khan
jn reply to those respected gentlemen, who had come from Kazerun to make

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Content

This file contains correspondence between the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain and the British Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushire, as well as Sheikh ‘Isā bin ‘Alī Āl Khalifah, ruler of Bahrain, and Sheikh Qāsim bin Mahzā’, Qāḍī of Bahrain.

The correspondence concerns the anti-British revolt of the Tangsiri and Qashqai tribes, headed by Ra’īs ‘Alī Dalvārī under the influence of Wilhelm Wassmuss, and the aftermath of their attack on the British Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Bushire on 12 July 1915. Included within the correspondence are: letters concerning the occupation of the town of Bushire, British counter-raids and the death of Ra’īs ‘Alī Delvārī; the imposition of a blockade on Tangsiri boats operating in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; statements and customs papers (Acquit de Sortie and Permis de Cabotage) from various Bahraini and Persian nākhudā s (dhow boat captains) gathered by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ; the arrest and detention of Yūsuf Fakhrū on suspicion of political dealings with Germany; attacks against British diplomatic missions and residents in Persia, including Shiraz and Isfahan; and information concerning German activities in Persia during the First World War.

Extent and format
1 file (203 folios)
Arrangement

This file is arranged approximately in chronological order.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: Foliation is written in pencil, in the top right corner of each folio. It begins with the first item of correspondence, on number 2, and runs through to 201, ending on the inside of the back cover of the volume.

Written in
English, French, Arabic and Persian in Latin and Arabic script
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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎23v] (44/411), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/50, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023813429.0x00002c> [accessed 19 November 2017]

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