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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎50r] (104/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Confidential-
PART II.
Detailed Account.
CHAPTER I.
Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (General Policy).
For, many years prior to his assumption of office in India, the
question of British policy in Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. had engaged the
Viceroy’s attention, and throughout His Excellency’s regime a constant inter
change of views on Indian interests in that region was maintained between
His Majesty’s Government and the Government of India. During the first
year of His Excellency’s Viceroyalty, His Lordship grappled with the Persian
"Problem. On the 21st September 1899, the Secretary of State for India
was addressed in a despatch which dealt comprehensively, in view of the
uncertainty of Persia’s future position, with the principles upon which British
policy towards that country is based, the objects which it should keep in view,
and the scope and limits of the respective shares of responsibility, political and
financial, which should he assumed by the two parties, England and India,
with the result that PerHa, which till 1899 was a matter of limited concern to
India, has now become a question which bulks largely in the work of the
Foreign Department, and about which no problem of importance is settled by
His Majesty’s Government without the Government of India being first asked
for their opinion and advice.
2. The general position of Persia at the beginning of the period of Lord
Curzon’s administration will best be explained by summarizing the despatch
which His Excellency addressed on 21st September 1899 to His Majesty’s
Secretary of State for India, the first of a series of despatches dealing with the
situation in Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , which, in view of their effect upon
the policy of His Majesty’s Government, as revealed by the acts and declara
tions of British Ministers since 1899, mark an epoch in the history of the rela
tions of Great Britain and India with Persia and must in themselves be con
sidered among the most important facts requiring record during the period of
Lord Curzon’s Viceroyalty.
3. The despatch of September 1899 began by pointing out that there was
no clear definition of the principles upon
General Position of Persia. which our policy towards Persia is based,
of the objects which it should keep in view, and of the scope and. limits of the
respective shares of responsibility, political and financial, which should he
assumed by the two partners, viz., ‘Her Majesty’s Government and the Govern
ment of India, who are jointly concerned in the defence of Anglo-Indian
interests in the dominions of the Shah. The need for such a discussion as to
how British interests should be definitely safeguarded in the future, and how
the necessary outlay should he shared between Great Britain and India was made
imperative by the existence of signs that the dissolution of Persia was drawing
near. The Government was clearly effete ; there was no prospect of recupera
tion or reform ; the country, hut feebly held together by any tie of race, religion
or loyalty, was saved from dissolution by the rival ambitions of two powers; the
rule of the present Shah was weaker than that of his predeoessor; the encroach
ments of Russian power were less veiled by any pretence of concealment, and,
moreover, other Governments and nationalities were being attracted to the scene.
4. Anglo-Indian interests in Persia, the despatch continued, were com
mercial, political, strategical, and telegraphic. The total annual value of
British trade with Persia had been cautiously estimated at three-and-a-half
millions sterling, of which the south and eastern portion belonged to India, the
north and western more peculiarly to the British Isles.
5. The political interests of Great Britain in Persia, though in the main
Indian in inception, and still largely Indian in character, were also Imperial,

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎50r] (104/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000069> [accessed 24 August 2019]

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