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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎54v] (113/386)

The record is made up of 1 volume (189 folios). It was created in 1907. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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10
and integrity of Persia, and to discuss, in the most friendly spirit, a possibility
of arrangements for a simultaneous advance by Great Britain and Russia, each
accepting its security of Persian revenues falling within the indicated sphere.
The only result was to prove the practical futility of Russian assurances.
32. Nor was Russian interference limited to efforts to reduce Persia to
financial tutelage. Her activity was widespread; her policy unswerving froift
her unmistakeahle goal and Lord Curzon decided in November 1001 to review
the general question of Persian Affairs in a despatch.
33. The place which this Despatch and Minute occupy in the subsequent
policy and pronouncements made by our Minister and Ambassador at Tehran and
St. Petersburg!! respectively under instructions from His Majesty’s Government
both to the Russian and Persian Governments and in the public declarations of
responsible Ministers is so marked that some detailed events of later Chapters
would be imperfectly understood without a study of the complete text. The
despatch, dated the 9th November 1301, ran as follow's : —
“ Incur despatches o ( 21st September 1899 and 6th September' 1900, we have already
fully acquainted Your Lordship and His Majesty’s Government with the views which are enter
tained by us with regard to British interests and British policy in Persia. Subsequent events
have more than confirmed the forecasts that were contained in our earlier letter, and have lent
additional weight to our appeal for a clear and emphatic enunciation of British policy ip
regard to that country. The negotiations fora further Russian loan to the Persian Govern
ment, and f r a new Commercial Treaty, designed in the interests of Russian and to the detri
ment of British trade; the apparently imminent construction of a Russian railway from
Ashkabad to Meshed, the capital of Khorasan;the activity of Russian representatives and
agents in Seistan and the regions c ntiguous to the Balnch border; thf* obstacles placed in the
way of the Nushki-Seistan trade route by Russian influence, both in respect of customs
arrangements and of quarantine ; the appearance of Russian Consular Agent* and of a mercan
tile service subsidised by the Russian Government in the Persian Gulf—all of these circum-
stanct s illustrate the rapidity with which the weakness of Persia is being turned to account by
her powerful neighbour ; while they also testify to the unswerving purpose with which the
policy of the Russian Government is directed to an obvious and unmistakeahle goal. We have
so recently submitted to Your Lordship our views of the imperative necessity of making up our
minds as to the point to whiih these ambitions may safely be pursued without coming into
direct collision with British and Indian interests, and of shaping our future action, both
diplomatic and commercial, accordingly, that we do net propose upon the present occasion
to trouble Your Lordship with any repetition of opinions with which you are already familiar.
It is sufficient to say that the even’s of the past two years have hut strengthened the
unanimity and force of the conviction to which we have previously given expression ; aud
that, in our judgment, the question of Persia and the Ptr-dan Gulf is on the verge of
becoming the most critical issue » f Central Asian politics. That these views are not substan
tially dissented from by His Majesty's Government is apyarent from the telegraphic inform?
ation which has reached rs from lour Lordship since the above piragrapb was written—
to the effect that the British representative at St. Petersburg has been authorised to
speak frankly to the Russian Foreign Minister concerning the respective par’s that should
be played, by Great Britain and Russia in the future maintenance and development of the
Persian Kingdom.
r< 2. On the present occasion we address Your Lordship with another though correlative
object. The determination of the attitude whic h is to be adopted by the Brit'sh Government
in view of the conditions which we have described, while to a large extent dependent upon
declarations or pledges already made, and upon the traditional history cf British policy in
those regions, must also be greatly affected by a consideration of the practical effect likely
to be produced upon British interests in the future by a continuance of, or an abrupt departure
from, those traditions Me take it to have been a common-place of British statesmanship
throughout the past century that in Southern Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. British influence
should remain supreme; and that, while at no time could the commercial competition of
other 1 ewers be reasonably resented, or legitimately opposed, yet the creation of rival
political interests in that quarter could not he permitted, without seriously com promising
the interests of India and therefore of Great Britain. We know of no Indian administration
and of no responsible British statesmen, who have not subscribed to these views. More
recently we have observed indications of a willingness in some quarters to recede from this
attitude, and to argue that the political predominance which has been acquired by Great
Britain in the regions in question, at so great an expenditure of energy and treasure,
may with impunity be challenged by others, and can safely be shared with them, and that no
menace need ensue to British interests from the construction, for instance, of a Russian
railway to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. or the acquisition by that Power of a port and naval station
upon its coastline. Upon this subject we conceive that no one has so strong a right to
speak as the Government of India seeing that it is Indian interests that are directly
involved : and we are confident that iu any decision that may be taken by His Majesty’s Gov
ernment due weight will be attached to this plea.

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Content

Printed at the GC [Government Central] Press, Simla.

The volume is divided into three parts: Part I (folios 5-47) containing an introduction; Part II (folios 48-125) containing a detailed account; and Part III (folios 126-188) containing despatches and correspondence connected with Part I Chapter IV ('The Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ', folios 28-47).

Part I gives an overview of policy and events in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region during Curzon's period as Viceroy [1899-1905], with sections on British policy in Persia; the maintenance and extension of British interests; Seistan [Sīstān]; and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Part II contains more detailed accounts of selected topics, including sections on British policy in Persia, customs and finance, quarantine, administration, communications, and British and Russian activity in Seistan. The despatches and correspondence in Part III include correspondence from the Government of India in the Foreign Department, the Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroy; addresses and speeches by Curzon; and notes of interviews between Curzon and local rulers.

Mss Eur F111/531-534 consist of four identical printed and bound volumes. However, the four volumes each show a small number of different manuscript annotations and corrections.

This volume contains manuscript additions on folios 8, 11-12, 14, 42 (a sixteen word note concerning the use by the Shaikh of Koweit [Kuwait] of a distinctive colour [flag] for Kuwait shipping), and 62-66.

Extent and format
1 volume (189 folios)
Arrangement

The volume contains a list of Parts I-III on folio 4; a table of contents of Part I on folio 6; a table of contents of Part II on folio 49; and a table of contents of Part III on folios 127-129, which gives a reference to the paragraph of Part I Chapter IV that the despatch or correspondence is intended to illustrate.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 191; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: the file also contains an original printed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [‎54v] (113/386), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, Mss Eur F111/534, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000072> [accessed 25 August 2019]

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<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100070118029.0x000072">'SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS AND MEASURES OF THE VICEROYALTY OF HIS EXCELLENCY LORD CURZON OF KEDLESTON, VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA IN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. I. JANUARY 1899-APRIL 1904. II. DECEMBER 1904-NOVEMBER 1905. VOLUME IV. PERSIA AND THE PERSIAN GULF.' [&lrm;54v] (113/386)</a>
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