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File 4011/1923 Pt 1 'PERSIAN GULF NEGOTIATIONS 1928-33. BASIDU.' [‎35r] (74/1306)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (649 folios). It was created in 22 Oct 1923-29 Nov 1933. It was written in English, French and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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GOHJltUiIOH
lATlmor Vol*ZZ-•
f.'^63« Xo
f,R.dat«d 20.11.29
32K.107/2.
Xorlmar Vol*I Ft*I
P*S73.
(1902)
torira©** Vol.l.Ft*!.
P%2147
i
Lorlmer Vol.II
p.ded.
Tehran deepatoh
Ho.392 of 12.8.53.
Larimer Vol.I.Pt.II
P.8107*
Larimer Yol.Z.Ft.XI
Pp.2147 and 2148.
Unless it can be deduced from other records,
there has never been any question of enlisting the local
inhabitants for defence purposes.
FAOIUTIHS FOa miknitims.
Before discussing the ^estlon of facilities
for inhabitants shioh would presumably inoludt such
matters as protecting thorn from Persian official
pretensions, it seems desirable to look Into th«* questior
of their nationality.
Practically the whole of the population of the
area are either fugitive slaves or the descendants of
fugitive slaves. Certain individuals possess Iritish
manumission certificates and on that account British
nationality has been claimed for them.
The immigration of non-British settlers was
definitely discouraged (though fugitive slaves were
always accorded an asylum). The same reference shows
that the settlement of British subjects was i ot to be
prevented, if they wished to settle there, but any
buildings erected should be temporary only, aad the sites
should be allotted by the Resident*
A Hindoo rice exporting firm which applied for
permission to land large quantities of rice and erect a /*
godown was discouraged from doing so.
The foregoing and also othef oases whiofc ii&ght ^
be cited may account for reduction in population referred
to in marginal note.
"The possession of the enclave is in felt toe
Indeterminate internationally for birth therel* to confer
any nationality at all upon the child so horn, with the
result that nationality of the father becomes the only
guide. w
As regards facilities none seems to hav^ been
consciously provided by the British Author!tiei solely
for the natives. Fugitive slaves have always teen
accepted and freed. IXiring the charge of Assistant
Surgeon Abdur Rahim petty annoyances encouraged by the
Shaikh of Kishra were arranged after full inveetlgatlon
by the Kesldkmt, but at that time there Were flur Indiar
Government officials and a guard.
The Persian Customs officials on Kisha Island
at one time (about 1905) seemed inclined to aaeoy the
residents of British Basidu* and tried to obliie native
•ailing vessels bringing supplies for the station to
discharge them at Old Basldu, where they were liable to
duty. The Persian Mudir of Customs used also lometlines
to pry within the British limits5 but, having been
threatened on on^ occasion by some emancipated slaves, he
discontinued the practice*
These • • • •

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Content

This volume relates to the British occupation of Basidu, situated on Kishm [Qeshm] Island in the Gulf, close to the south coast of Persia [Iran], and occupied by the British since the early 1820s. It is stated in the correspondence that the site had been used mainly as a coal depot for British naval vessels until 1913, and that since then it has been retained on 'political grounds', as a potential bargaining asset in negotiations with Persia.

The correspondence primarily concerns the British claim (or lack thereof) to Basidu, in the event of the Persian Government questioning Britain's ongoing occupation. It covers the history of Basidu's status and the various existing agreements that relate to it, as part of an attempt by the British to gather documentary evidence to support their claim. Also discussed are a number of reported incidents at Basidu, involving British representatives and the local Persian authorities, mainly regarding customs, taxes, and the presence of the British naval guard. In addition, the correspondence touches on Anglo-Persian relations in general, with occasional references being made to ongoing treaty negotiations between the two countries.

The volume's principal correspondents are as follows: the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; the British Minister in Tehran; the Senior Naval Officer in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; officials of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. , the Foreign Office, the Admiralty, and the Government of India's Foreign and Political Department. Other notable but less frequent correspondents include the following: the Foreign Secretary to the Government of India; the Viceroy of India; the Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies Station; the Law Officers of the Crown.

Included with the correspondence are several related documents, including the following: two sketch maps (f 622); copies (in English and Arabic) of a treaty dated 1856 between Muscat and Persia, in which the Imam of Muscat acknowledges Kishm Island as being part of the Persian Empire (f 179 and ff 221-223); draft and final copies of an India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. memorandum dated 18 October 1933, outlining Britain's understanding of the history of the status of Basidu from 1720 to 1928, including extracts from nineteenth century reports and related correspondence (ff 46-54 and ff 123-159); a submission of reference, prepared by the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. and the Foreign Office, for the Law Officers of the Crown, requesting the latter's legal opinion on the strength of the British claim to Basidu (ff 43-45 and ff 67-83); a copy of a secret report on Basidu, prepared by the Commander-in-Chief at the East Indies Station, containing extracts from the East Indies Station's records and notes from the Senior Naval Officer in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (ff 16-38).

The Arabic language material consists of the aforementioned treaty text. The material written in French consists of small extracts from correspondence and treaty articles. It should be noted that there is no material covering the years 1924 and 1925.

The volume includes two dividers, which give a list of correspondence references contained in the volume by year. These are placed at the back of the correspondence (ff 4-5).

Extent and format
1 volume (649 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in approximate chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume.

The subject 4011 ( Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Negotiations) consists of two volumes, IOR/L/PS/10/1094-1095. The volumes are divided into two parts, with each part comprising one volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence (used for referencing) commences at the inside front cover with 1, and terminates at the inside back cover with 651; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio.

Written in
English, French and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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File 4011/1923 Pt 1 'PERSIAN GULF NEGOTIATIONS 1928-33. BASIDU.' [‎35r] (74/1306), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/10/1094, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100077104051.0x00004b> [accessed 22 November 2019]

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