Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎13] (156/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

0
13
ed in general terms by a Farman of the Mughal Emperor; and shortlj
afterwards, apparently in January 1613, an English trading Factory was
established at Surat in charge of Thomas Aid worth.
The local demand in India proving insufficient to relieve the Surat
Factory of an excessive quantity of broadcloth which had been ordered
from England, Aldworth was obliged to seek another market, and his
attention was directed by his enquiries to Bahrain and to Persia. His
principal informant appears to have been one R ichard Steel, a trader in
Persia, who had come to India in pursuit of a runaway debtor; but
Aldworth may have been influenced also by Sir Robert Sherley, who told
Kerridge, one of the Company's servants, that, " if the English did not
come to Persia, he would bring the Dutch." Accordingly, in 1615,
Steel himself and a Factor named John Crouther, having been furnished
with funds for their journey and with letters of introduction to Sir Robert
Sherley, left for Isfahan by land, vid Ajmir, partly to procure further
information in regard to Persian trade and partly to solicit a Farman
from the Shah a for the fair and peaceable entertainment of our men,
ships and goods in all such ports as they shall arrive at;" and it was
apparently intended that special arrangements should be requested for
trade at the port of Jashk. These two pioneers of English commerce
were successful in their mission; they obtained a Farman from Shah
Abbas, of which a copy reached Ajmir on the 10th of February 1616.
directing the governors of seaport towns in Persia to receive and assist
any English vessels that might present themselves; and they remained
in Persia, and continued to correspond with the Company, during a part
at least of the year of 1616.
While this preliminary mission was in progress, an important step of
a different kind was taken by the East India Company in London. Experi
ence had convinced them that their commercial interests in India would
be served hv the residence of a diplomatic representative of the King of
England at tie court of the Great Mughal; they accordingly suggested
that Sir Thmias Roe, a gentleman of eminent capacity with some
experience of "ravel and of courts, might be accredited by King James as
Ambassador :o the Mughal Emperor; and their request was at once
granted. Sir Thomas Roe, whose instructions precluded him from inter
ference in purely mercantile matters, arrived at Ajmir in December 1615;
and the copy of the Farman of Shah 'Abbas, mentioned above, together
with letters from Steel and Crouther which accompanied it, were opened
by him there^ as there was no Factor of the Company at hand.
The prestige and power of the Portuguese in the East, where—as
already explained—they represented Spain as well as their own country.
Mission of
Steel and
Crouther to
Persia, 1615-
16.
Embassy of
Sir Thomas
Roe to India,
1615-18.
Affairs of the
Portuguese

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎13] (156/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009d> [accessed 22 May 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009d">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;13] (156/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009d">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0156.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image