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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎178] (321/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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178
Disturbed condition of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 1798-1805,
While Great Britain concentrated her attention on the real or
imagined schemes of Napoleon in Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan and
Arabia, a state of general disorganisation and insecurity was fast coming
into existence in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the remedying of which was destined
to cost her in the end far more, both in military effort and in
money, than the short-lived scare of French aggression upon India,
The causes of unrest were various; but the principal among them seem
to have been the natural turbulence and rapacity of certain maritime
Arab tribes, particularly the Qawasim,* the alarming growth in Najd
and ultimate appearance in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. of the Wahhabi power of
Central Arabia, the ambition and naval resources of the Saiyid of 'Oman,
and the weakness of the Arab principality of Bahrain. Had the Govern
ment of India, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, understood
the real seriousness of the local situation, had they given more attention
to the earliest symptoms of maritime disorder in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and
less to problems of high policy at the capitals of the Middle East, bad
they in short taken a close rather than a comprehensive survey of the
position, it is possible that the immediate interests of the British Empire
would have been better served by their action. The case, however, was
probably one in which to be wise before the event required more thai;
human foresight; and it is possible that, if the great political missions of
the period to the Persian Court had never started, the position of Britain
in Persia at the present day would have been much less considerable thai,
it is.
The Wahhabi movement, as explained in the chapter on the historv
of Najd, had its beginnings in Central Arabia about the middle of ^
andTtVexten- 11 e ighteenth century; and, though it was in its origin religious, it quickly
sion to the assumed a political and secular shape. The result was the formation of a
Ked Sea and
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
1798-1805.
Development
of the
Wahhabi
• The term "Qawasim," it should be ohaerved, was at this time nsed in a
sense to designate all the tribes of the coast of North -Westem 'Oman (iooluding ^
Qawasim proper ) who engaged in piracy : in other words, apparently, the inhabita'^
of all the ports of that coast except Dibai and Abu Dhabi.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎178] (321/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00007a> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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