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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎179] (322/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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179
fanatical and at the same time ag-gressive and even predatory state, which
found in pious principles a warrant for the plunder and pillage of its
neighbours, and against which those neighbours, for want of enthusiasm
and a proper military organisation, were unable effectively to contend.
Before the opening of the period now under consideration the Wahhabis
had begun, in opposite directions, to make war on the Sharif of Makkah
and to harass the Shaikh of Kuwait, and had partially conquered the
principality of Hasa, governed by the Bani Khalid, on the western side
of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . An expedition despatched against them in 1798
by the Pasha of Baghdad, whose frontier towards the Arabian desert had
already for some time been exposed to their ravages, reached the Hasa
Oasis; but it was unable to expel the Wahhabi garrisons there, or to
proceed any further on its way to the Wahhabi capital of Dara'Iyah,
The Turkish commander, in his retirement upon Turkish ^Iraq, was
beset by a large Wahhabi force and concluded a six years' truce with
the son of the Amir: it was afterwards ratified by the Pasha of
Baghdad but it was not respected by the "Wahhabis In 1800 the capture
of the port of Qatif completed the conquest of Hasa by the Wahhabis
and brought them down to the shores of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; in the same
year they occupied the oasis of Baraimi, from which they commenced to
threaten both the Pirate Coast and the ; Oman Sultanate; and by 1803
they had established their supremacy over the whole Arabian coast of the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , including Bahrain, between Kuwait and the 'Oman Sultanate,
on neither of which last, however, they had as yet made any serious
impression. In 1801 the outlying town of Karbala in Turkish 'Iraq
was surprised and sacked in a few hours, with its sacred Shi ; ah shrine of
Husain, by a Wahhabi host, who at the same time perpetrated a frightful
massacre of the unarmed inhabitants ; and the incident was of some general
importance, for it provoked deep indignation in Persia against the Pasha
of Baghdad for his want of vigilance. In 1802, by way of reprisals,
a second expedition against the Wahhabis in their own territories was
organised by the Pasha of Baghdad; but, like the first, it ended abor
tively. Meanwhile, in 1801-02, the Wahhabis, whose energy at this
time was equal to the most distant, diverse, and extraordinary enter
prises, had possessed themselves of Makkah ; in 1804 Madinah also
submitted to their yoke; and they then proceeded to subjugate other
parts of the province of Yaman. Around, upon the circumference of
the Wahhabi empire thus extended, perpetual terror reigned; and the
rulers of Turkish Iraq, Kuwait and 'Oman no longer knew a moment's
repose.
21 a

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎179] (322/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00007b> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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